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Board of Selectmen: 
Seated (1-r) David Player, Jr., William E. George, 

James R. Engel 
Standing (1-r) Thomas A. Elliott, Chairman, Robert H. Leet 



Cover: Photo by: George S. Djerbaka 



ANNUAL REPORT 
TOWN OF IPSWICH 

1988 



NOTES 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

1988 ANNUAL TOWN REPORT 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Roster of Town Officials and Committees 2 

April 04, 1988 Annual Town Meeting 5 

Operating Budget 7 

June 20, 1988 Special Town Meeting 32 

September 19, 1988 Special Town Meeting 38 

Board of Sel ectmen 46 

Town Manager 46 

Assessor's Office 47 

Building Department 48 

Cemetery, Parks and Buildings Department 49 

Civil Defense 49 

Commuter Rai 1 Commi ttee 50 

Conservation Commission 51 

Dog and Animal Control 52 

F i re Department 52 

Hall -Haskell House Committee 53 

Harbormaster 53 

Health Department 54 

Sealer of Weights & Measurers 55 

Historical Commission 55 

Ipswich Arts Lottery Council 56 

Library 57 

Master Plan Commission 58 

Planning Board 58 

Pol i ce Department 59 

Public Works Department 60 

Recreation and Youth Department 62 

School Committee 63 

Superintendent of Schools 64 

Department of Special Services 65 

Winthrop School 66 

Paul F. Doy on Memorial School 67 

Ipswich Middle School 68 

Ipswich High School 68 

Shellfish Deparment 69 

Town Clerk 70 

Town Counsel 71 

Treasurer/Col lector 71 

Water/Sewer Departments 72 

Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School 74 

Electric Department 75 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 75 

Zoning Board of Appeals * 76 

Ipswich Housing Authority 76 

Revenue Sharing/Handicapped Regulations 77 

Financial Statement-Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1988 78 

-1- 



CONSTABLE 
Joyce A. Gysan 



1988 ROSTER OF TOWN OFFICIALS AND COMMITTEES 
ELECTED 
1989 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 
E2 Elected At Town Meeting 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 
Walter Ziemlak 
Stanley Eustace 
Sarah S. O'Connor, Ch 
Arthur Weagle 
Loretta Dietch/State 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
Jeffrey Simon, Ch 
Cynthia Quinn 
David Pauley 
Margot Sherwood 
Carl Soderland 
Norman Sheppard 
Lawrence E. Seidler 

TOWN MODERATOR 
A. James Grimes 





Walter J. Pojasek 


1990 




George Jewell 


1991 


1991 


Constance Surpitski 


1989 


1990 


03 Appointed By Moderator 




1989 


William Craft, Ch 


1991 


1993 


Clarence S. Dupray 


1990 


1991 


Alice Shurcliff 
S Appointed By Selectmen 


1989 




John Markos 


1990 


1989 


Allen G. Swan 


1991 


1989 


Lawrence Pszenny 


1989 


1990 






1991 


E BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




1991 


Thomas A. Elliott 


1989 


1990 


Robert H. Leet 


1990 


1990 


James R. Engel 


1990 




David S. Player, Jr. 


1989 




Wil liam E. George 


1991 



SI ACCOUNTANT 
Barry Boyce 

Ml ASSESSOR 

Frank J. Ragonese 

Ml BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Joseph Ferruzzi 

Ml CEMETERY/PARKS SUPERINTENDENT 
James E. Graff urn 

Ml DOG OFFICER/ANIMAL INSPECTOR 
Harry W. Leno, Jr. 

Ml ENGINEER 

James E. Chase 

Ml FIRE CHIEF 

Edwin R. Emerson 

Ml HARBORMASTER 

Charles D. Surpitski 

Ml HEALTH AGENT 
Domenic Badolato 

Ml LIBRARIAN 
Eleanor Gaunt 

Ml TOWN PLANNER 
Elizabeth Ware 



1989 

APPOINTED ADMINISTRATION 

Ml POLICE CHIEF 



Charles D. Surpitski, Acting Chief 

Ml PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR 
Armand T. Michaud 

Ml RECREATION DIRECTOR 
Elizabeth Dorman 

Ml SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 
Philip Kent 

7 SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
Richard F. Thompson 

Ml TOWN CLERK 

Isobel N. Coulombe 

Ml TOWN COUNSEL 

Charles C. Dalton 

S TOWN MANAGER 
George E. Howe 

SI TREASURER/COLLECTOR 
Virginia M. Cleary 

Ml DEPUTY COLLECTOR 
Wil 1 iam Handren 

SI ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT MANAGER 
Donald R. Stone 



-2- 



APPOINTED BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



M CEMETERY & PARKS COMMISSION 
S. Joseph Favalora 
Nicholas Markos 
Gordon C. Player 

M CIVIL DEFENSE 

David Clements, Dir 
John T. Clogston, Asst 

S COMMUTER RAIL COMMITTEE 
Dorcas Rice 
Jim Berry 
Vivian Endicott 
Joseph Carl in 
William Varrell, Ch 
James McC. Hayward 
Anne Teele 

M6 CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
Lillian V. North, Ch 
Robert B. Porter 
John C. Phillips 
Donald M. Kent 
Jim Berry 

Richard A. Nylen, Jr. 
William Barton 



COUNCIL ON AGING 
Winfred Hardy, Ch 
Gertrude Emery 
Helen Drenth 
Rita Poirier 
Anthony Christopher 
Jeanne N. Parker 
Marion Rogers 

FAIR HOUSING COMMITTEE 
George E. Howe, Dir. 
Tone Kenney 
Sara O'Connor 
Marion Middlebrooks 



S GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 
Peter J. Dziadose 
Kris Muench 
Carol Kingston 
Peter Lampropoulos 

M BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
Frank J. Ragonese 
John D. Heaphy 
John Moberger 



M6 



1991 


Mary P. Conley, Ch 


1991 


1990 


Susan Nelson 


1990 


1989 


Donald Curiale 


1990 




George R. Mathey 


1990 




William S. Effner 


1991 


1989 


Ruthanne Rogers 


1989 


1989 


Robert St. George 


1991 




S INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 


FINANCING 


1989 


AUTHORITY 




1989 


George E. Howe, Ch 


1991 


1989 


James C. Lahar 


1992 


1989 


Richard Emery 


1989 


1989 


Loretta Dietch 


1990 


1989 


Susan C. Hubbard 


1993 


1989 


S IPSWICH ARTS COUNCIL 






Nancy Warner, Ch 


1989 


1990 


Mary Pol lak 


1989 


1990 


Georgina Jill Traverso 


1990 


1990 


Mary Weatherall 


1989 


1991 


Jane E. Reiman 


1989 


1991 


Harry Zelzter 


1990 


1989 


Jon Aaron 


1990 


1989 


Kristin Ledson 


1990 




Paul Soffron 


1990 




Kate Kimball 


1990 




Michele S. McGrath 


1990 




Jane Harold 


1990 


1989 


Gene Hail son 


1990 


1990 


Chip Dort 


1990 


1990 






1991 


S LIBRARY TRUSTEES 




1991 


Crocker Snow, Sr., Ch 


1989 


1989 


Donald M. Greenough 


1990 


1989 


Hubert Johnson 


1990 




Lawrence Pszenny 


1990 




Martha Gil lespie 


1991 


1989 


Virginia Jackson 


1991 


1989 


Bette Siegel 


1989 


1989 


Louise Sweetser 


1989 


1989 


George R. Gray 

MASTER PLAN COMMISSION 


1991 




08 Catherine Lefebvre 


1989 


1989 


S Charles J. Wayne 


1989 


1989 


Benjamin Fierro, III 


1989 


1989 


James M. Barney 


1989 


1989 


Patrick J. McNally 


1989 




Richard F. Howard 


1989 




James Theodosopoulos 


1989 


1990 


Douglas Denninger, Ch 


1989 


1989 


08 Carl Gardner 


1989 


1991 


Ruthanne Rogers 


1989 




George R. Mathey 


1989 



-3- 



APPOINTED BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



03 HALL-HASKELL HOUSE COMMITTEE 
Vivian Endicott, Ch 
Theresa Stephens 
Helen M. Burr 
Donald Curiale 
Cathleen R. McGinley 
William L. Thoen 
Norman Quint 

M BOARD OF HEALTH 
David Carleton, Ch 
Kenneth L. Zinn, M.D. 
Susan C. Hubbard 

M RECREATION COMMISSION 
Jim Prato 

Mark J. Perrone, Ch 
Bruce Bryant 
Marion Diamond 
Stephen G. Markos 
Linda M. Murphy 
James W. Foley 

S REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Peter Ross 

Barbara Kasuba 

Kristian Muench 
Ml Isobel N. Coulombe, Clerk 

S SHELLFISH ADVISORY BOARD 
Thomas Dorman, Ch 
Melvin A. Bowen 
Alice H. Thanos 
Andrew Gianakaki s 
Forrest W. MacGilvary 
Anthony Christopher 

S TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 
Sturgis P. Papagiotis 

S WATER SUPPLY COMMITTEE 
James Engel , Ch 
Robert 0. Butcher 
Robert Comeau 
Scott Greeley 
Gerald Priestman 
Leonard Heurlin 

S WATERWAYS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
George C. Scott, Jr. 
Jane Rieman 
Gary J. Hami Hon, Ch. 
Marc C. Silverman 





M 


PLANNING BOARD 




1989 




William E. Bingham 


1991 


1989 




Stanley Bornstein 


1992 


1989 




Patrick J. McNally 


1993 


1989 




Kenneth Savoie 


1990 


1989 




Catherine Lefebvre 


1989 


1989 








1989 


S 


ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 








James Theodosopoulos, Ch 


1992 






David Levesque 


1993 


1990 




William J. Murphy 


1989 


1991 




Daniel B. Lunt, Jr. 


1990 


1989 




Douglas Denninger 


1991 






John R. Verani , Associate 


1989 






Joseph R. Petranek " 


1989 


1990 








1990 








1991 


M 


BELL RINGER 




1991 




Stanley Eustace 


1988 


1989 








1989 


M 


GAS INSPECTOR 




1990 




A.N.D. Hyde 


C.S. 




M 


PARKING CLERK 




1989 




Wil liam Handren 


1989 


1990 








1991 


M 


PLUMBING INSPECTOR 




1989 




A.N.D. Hyde 


C.S. 




M 


ALTERNATE PLUMBING INSPECTOR 




1989 




David W. French 


C.S. 


1989 








1989 


M 


SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 




1989 




Normand J. Bedard 


1989 


1989 








1989 


M 


WIRING INSPECTOR 





1990 



1989 


E 


1989 


S 


1989 


M 


1989 





1989 


1 


1989 


2 




3 




4 


1989 


5 


1989 


6 


1989 


7 


1988 


8 



Raymond Budzianowski 1989 



APPOINTMENT LEGEND 
Elected 

Appointed By Board of Selectmen 
Appointed By Town Manager 
Other 

Supervised By Town Manager 
Elected At Town Meeting 
Appointed By Moderator 
General Laws 
1976 STM, Article II 
Confirmed by Board of Selectmen 
Appointed by School Committee 
Appointed by Conservation Com. 



-4, 



1988 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

Ipswich High School April 04, 1988 

ESSEX, ss 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby directed to 

notify the inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, qualified to vote in Town 

affairs, to meet at the IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL, in said Ipswich on MONDAY, THE 

FOURTH DAY OF APRIL, 1988, at 7:30 o'clock in the evening, then and there to 

act on the following articles, viz: 

There was no quorum at 7:30 p.m., and the Moderator asked for a 15-minute 
postponement. Seconded and so voted. After several such postponements, a 
quorum of 341 was reached at 8:50 p.m. and the Meeting was called to order. 
Superintendent of Schools Richard Thompson led the Pledge of Allegiance. The 
final count was 370. 

It was moved, seconded and voted to admit non-voters to view the proceedings. 

The Moderator announced that some articles would be taken out of order, in 
case they had to go on the ballot. 

ARTICLE 1 

To fix the salary and compensation of all elected Town Officers. 

Chairman of the Board of Selectmen William E. George moved that the salary 
and compensation of all elected Town officials be approved as presented in 
the budget. Seconded. Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Motion 
carried on unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 2 

To choose the followir.g officers, viz: Constable for one (1) year; Moderator 
for one (1) year; one (1) Selectman for three (3) years; one (1) member of 
the Housing Authority for five (5) years; and two (2) members of the School 
Committee for three (3) years. 

The above officers to be voted on one ballot at their respective polling 
places as follows: Precinct 1--Agawam Village Recreation Hall, County Road; 
Precinct 2--Winthrop School, Central Street; Precinct 3--Ipswich High School, 
High Street; Precinct 4--Whittier Manor Recreation Hall, Caroline Avenue; on 
Monday, April 11, 1988. The polls shall open at 10:00 a.m. and close at 
8:00 p.m.; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman Thomas A. Elliott moved that the Town vote to choose the following 
officers, viz: Constable for one (1) year; Moderator for one(2) year; one 
(1) Selectman for three (3) years; one (1) member of the Housing Authority 
for five (5) years; and two (2) members of the School Committee for three (3) 
years. The above officers to be voted on one ballot at their respective 
polling places as follows: Precinct 1 - Agawam Village Recreation Hall, 
County Road; Precinct 2 - Winthrop School, Central Street; Precinct 3 - 
Ipswich High School, High Street; Precinct 4 - Whittier Manor Recreation 
Hall, Caroline Avenue; on Monday, April 11, 1988. The polls shall open at 
10:00 a.m. and close at 8:00 p.m. Seconded. Motion carried on a unanimous 
voice vote. 

-5- 



ARTICLE 3 

To choose one (1) member of the Finance Committee for three (3) years. 

Selectman David S. Player moved that the Town Meeting elect George Jewell as 
a member of the Finance Committee for a term of three (3) years. Seconded. 
Mr. Jewell has served four years on the Committee and has done a commendable 
job. Selectmen, Finance Committee, School Committee unanimously recommended. 
Motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 4 

To see if the Town will vote pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 44, 
Section 53E of the General Laws to establish a revolving fund in the 
Department of Planning, and to appropriate the sum of $5,000 thereto, said 
sum to be offset by $5,000 in estimated receipts from the fees charged to 
users of the services provided by said Department; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Selectman Robert Leet moved that the Town vote pursuant to the provisions of 
Chapter 44, Secton 53E of the General laws to establish a revolving fund in 
the Department of Planning, and to appropriate the sum of $5,000 thereto, 
said sum to be offset by $5,000 in estimated receipts from the fees charged 
to users of the services provided by said Department. Seconded. Selectmen, 
Finance Committee unanimously approved. Motion carried on unanimous vote. 

ARTICLE 5 

To hear and act upon the report of the Finance Committee relative to the 
municipal budget and to raise, appropriate, and transfer money for the 
ensuing year, including the compensation of elected Town Officers, and to 
authorize the expenditure of a sum of monies from the Federal General Revenue 
Sharing account for the aforementioned purposes; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Finance Chairman William Craft, after comparing the FY88 and FY89 budgets, 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $6,179,925 for 
the purposes indicated in the FY89 Operating Budget as outlined in the 
Finance Committee Report, pp 14-19, and further moved that: 

For the Operating Budget of $6,179,925, the Town 

Transfer from Available Funds: 

Surplus Revenue (Free Cash) 587,308 

Sewer Betterments 67,360 

Sewer Rent Liens and Unreserved Fund Balance 45,640 

Water Pollution Control (Cherry Sheet) 11,228 

Library Aid (Cherry Sheet) 9,909 

Library Incentive Aid 3,235 

Library Aid Prior Year (Cherry Sheet) 5,579 

General Dog Fund 1,420 

Overlay Surplus: To Reserve Fund 45,000 

Overlay Surplus: Sanitation Contract 380,000 

Cemetery Perpetual Care & Flowers Fund 36,300 

Street Betterment Receipts 1,204 

Newmarch Grant Reimbursement 49,603 

HUD Grant Reimbursement 5,777 

-6- 



Tennis Court Balance 
State OPW (10/86) 
350th Celebration Fund 

Transfer from Revenue Sharing: 
Sanitation Contract 

Available Funds and Revenue Sharing 

Net to be raised and assessed 



Total 



$ 2,353 

283,456 

14,196 

$962,260 

9,061 

$1,558,629 

$4,621,296 



OPERATING BUDGET 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT 









FY88 * 


FY89 




FY86 


FY87 


Appro- 


Recom- 




Expended 


Expended 


priated 


mended 


003 SELECTMEN: 










Salaries & Wages 


$ 11,301 


$ 13,044 


$ 13,643 $ 


15,839 


Expenses 


3,441 


3,644 


4,955 


5,555 


Total 


14 v 742 


16,688 


18,598 


21,394 


005 TOWN MANAGER: 










Salaries & Wages 


$ 77,613 


$ 83,691 


$ 91,208 


$ 96,513 


Expenses 


14,968 


17,391 


21,243 


22,317 


Labor Consultants 


9,240 


12,576 


5,000 


5,000 


Capital Outlay 








4,458 


13,708 


Total 


101,821 


113,658 


121,909 


137,538 


009 MODERATOR: 










Salary 


100 


100 


100 


100 


Expenses 








10 


10 


Total 


100 


100 


110 


110 


Oil FINANCE COMMITTEE: 










Salaries & Wages 








50 


50 


Expenses 


2,906 


2,588 


2,960 


2,975 


Total 


2,906 


2,588 


3,010 


3,025 


015 ELECTIONS & REGISTRATION: 










Salaries & Wages 


9,046 


14,242 


9,663 


17,921 


Expenses 


4,812 


6,014 


5,150 


6,211 


Total 


13,858 


20,256 


14,813 


24,132 


025 ACCOUNTANT: 










Salaries & Wages 


74,870 


92,904 


90,437 


93,555 


Expenses 


25,367 


32,421 


33,484 


27,842 


Total 


100,237 


125,325 


123,921 


121,397 


029 ASSESSORS: 










Salaries & Wages 


68,714 


73„339 


78,949 


86,089 


Valuation Fee 








205,000 


3,000 


Expenses 


9,219 


8,693 


9,918 


10,825 


Capital Outlay 





68 





500 


Total 


77,933 


82,100 


293,867 


100,414 



-7- 



033 TREASURER/COLLECTOR: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

039 TOWN CLERK: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

045 LEGAL DEPARTMENT: 
Salaries & Wages 
Town Counsel -Litigation 
Expenses 
Total 

061 APPEALS BOARD: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

063 PLANNING BOARD: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Planning Consultants: 

Reimbursable 

General 

Capital Outlay 
Total 

064 MASTER PLAN COMMISSION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Planning Consultants: 
Total 

065 TOWN HALL & ANNEX: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 

Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 







FY88 * 


FY89 


FY86 


FY87 


Appro- 


Recom- 


Expended 


Expended 


priated 


mended 


88,927 


86,735 


100,103 


85,589 


10,577 


9,302 


10,847 


13,785 





1,563 





4,445 


99,504 


97,600 


110,950 


103,819 


33,884 


36,454 


39,192 


40,668 


3,299 


2,088 


2,360 


2,710 








5,890 


775 


37,183 


38,542 


47,442 


44,153 


10,000 


10,000 


12,000 


12,000 


22,646 


20,143 


20,000 


20,000 


654 


2,197 


2,080 


2,580 


33,300 


32,340 


34,080 


34,580 


1,107 


1,325 


1,425 


2,865 


314 


354 


501 


701 


168 











1,589 


1,679 


1,926 


3,566 


7,500 


32,094 


43,475 


45,918 


1,110 


2,397 


5,900 


7,380 














1,099 





20,760 


8,200 


499 








1,837 


10,158 


34,491 


70,135 


63,335 





855 


1,000 


1,000 





76 





1,100 


1,840 





5,000 


5,100 


1,840 


931 


6,000 


7,200 


15,681 


16,868 


18,199 


18,330 


15,297 


11,888 


19,264 


15,990 


7,051 


6,294 


7,500 


7,500 


3,347 


3,561 


56,313 


6,744 


41,376 


38,611 


101,276 


48,564 



536,547 



604,909 



948,037 713,227 



-8- 



101 



102 



103 



109 



112 



113 



131 









FY88 * 


FY89 




FY86 


FY87 


Appro- 


Recom- 




Expended 


Expended 


priated 


mended 




PUBLIC SAFETY 








POLICE DEPARTMENT: 










Salaries & Wages 


618,881 


687,919 


785,718 


827,795 


Expenses 


19,762 


20,375 


26,451 


29,061 


Energy Supplies 


28,719 


30,567 


30,900 


32,060 


Capital Outlay 


24,339 


27,654 


34 , 192 


31,230 


Total 


691,701 


766,515 


877,261 


920,146 


HARBORS: 










Salaries & Wages 


11,120 


11,714 








Expenses 


7,079 


4,941 


3,945 


4,360 


Energy Supplies 


503 


439 


810 


900 


Capital Outlay 


16,447 


768 


15,700 


1,640 


Total 


35,149 


17,862 


20,455 


6,900 


FIRE DEPARTMENT: 










Salaries & Wages 


401,051 


421,130 


547,890 


569,921 


Training 


320 


921 


3,036 


3,000 


Expenses 


25,462 


35,016 


31,020 


50,156 


Energy Supplies 


5,214 


4,047 


4,831 


5,695 


Capital Outlay 


25,017 


12,871 


19,540 


47,310 


Total 


457,064 


473,985 


606,317 


676,082 


FORESTRY: 










Salaries & Wages 


53,987 


60,461 


68,530 


69,786 


Expenss 


16,468 


20,889 


19,383 


23,715 


Energy Supplies 


3,042 


2,227 


2,475 


2,825 


Capital Outlay 


1,106 


4,025 


1,000 


1,000 


Total 


74,603 


87,602 


91,388 


97,326 


SHELLFISH: 










Salaries & Wages 


24,692 


25,651 


35,500 


36,660 


Expenses 





792 


1,500 


1,500 


Consultants 


2,293 


747 


2,545 


2,495 


Energy Supplies 


913 


677 


810 


765 


Capital Outlay 








1,500 





Total 


27,898 


27,867 


41,855 


41,420 


BUILDING INSPECTOR: 










Salaries & Wages 


31,538 


36,938 


38,788 


41,774 


Energy Supplies 








600 


600 


Expenses 


2,008 


3,386 


4,291 


3,446 


Capital Outlay 


292 


599 


2,001 


1,816 


Total 


33,838 


40,923 


45,680 


47,636 


CIVIL DEFENSE: 










Sa-laries & Wages 


2,400 


2,400 


2,400 


3,000 


Expenses 


1,836 


1,946 


2,125 


2,125 


Energy Supplies 


10 


23 


75 


75 


Capital Outlay 














Total 


4,246 


4,369 


4,600 


5,200 



-9- 











FY88 * 


FY89 






FY86 


FY87 


Appro- 


Recom- 






Expended 


Expended 


priated 


mended 


133 


ANIMAL CONTROL: 












Salaries & Wages 


15,527 


17,000 


18,250 


19,345 




Expenses 


3,702 


3,892 


6,902 


4,804 




Energy Supplies 


668 


467 


680 


700 




Capital Outlay 





820 





8,200 




Total 


19,897 


22,178 


25,832 


33,049 




TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY: 


1,344,396 
PUBLIC WORKS 


1,441,301 


1,713,388 


1,827,759 


301 


ADMINISTRATION: 












Salaries & Wages 


41,866 


44,918 


50,758 


53,027 




Expenses 


1,670 


1,508 


1,845 


2,335 




Capital Outlay 


900 


206 


230 







Total 


44,436 


46,632 


52,833 


55,362 


303 


HIGHWAY DIVISION: 












Salaries & Wages 


127,895 


139,619 


159,961 


163,873 




Expenses 


132,750 


128,077 


138,498 


146,849 




Road Treatment 


99,406 


149,995 


280,000 


246,000 




Capital Outlay 


98,498 


7,997 


64,853 


116,325 




Total 


458,549 


425,688 


643,312 


673,047 


305 


SNOW & ICE CONTROL: 












Salaries & Wages 


17,892 


35,750 


25,000 


25,000 




Expenses 


60,307 


79,754 


63,350 


63,350 




Energy Supplies 


3,592 


4,247 


5,600 


5,600 




Rental 


6,229 


26,949 


12,000 


27,000 




Total 


88,020 


146,700 


105,950 


120,950 


309 


EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE: 












Salaries & Wages 


22,407 


23,613 


25,851 


26,013 




Consultants 








500 







Expenses 


27,390 


23,300 


30,037 


29,485 




Energy Supplies 


10,641 


6,454 


9,500 


9,940 




Capital Outlay 


13,080 





6,000 


1,500 




Total 


73,518 


53,367 


71,888 


66,938 




TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS: 


664,523 
SANITATION 


672,387 


873,983 


916,297 


403 


SANITATION CONTRACT: 












Sanitation Composite Contract 


307,000 


319,500 


342,000 


371,000 




Spring & Fal 1 Cleaning 


7,500 


17,000 


19,175 


22,350 




Total 


314,500 


336,500 


361,175 


393,350 


409 


SEWER: 












Salaries & Wages 


141,084 


152,609 


166,490 


175,253 




Expenses 


151,317 


158,044 


192,397 


225,369 




Energy Supplies 


7,965 


4,771 


8,778 


10,938 




Capital Outlay 


1,478 


10,914 


7,000 


10,000 




Total 


301,855 


326,338 


374,665 


421,560 



TOTAL SANITATION: 



616,355 



662,838 



735,840 814,910 



-10- 







FY88 * 


FY89 


FY86 


FY87 


Appro- 


Recom- 


Expended 


Expended 


priated 


mended 



OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES 



481 HISTORICAL COMMISSION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

487 CONSERVATION COMMISSION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



TOTAL OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES 2,619 

HUMAN SERVICES 









500 


500 


235 


226 


7,225 


4,025 








20,000 





235 


226 


27,725 


4,525 


1,100 


1,200 


1,400 


1,600 


290 


387 


700 


725 


994 


1,134 


1,000 


1,175 


2,384 


2,721 


3,100 


3,500 



2,947 



30,825 



8,025 



501 HEALTH: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

531 COUNCIL ON AGING: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Total 

551 VETERAN'S BENEFIT: 
Expenses 
Total 

571 CEMETERIES & GROUNDS: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES 



601 LIBRARY 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



48,430 

80,136 

4,204 

132,770 


54,305 

70,395 

1,166 

125,866 


60,384 

140,686 

200 

201,270 


67,390 

306,976 

1,160 

375,526 


3,892 
14,129 
18,021 


7,775 
19,194 
26,969 


8,216 
19,869 
28,085 


8,556 
20,289 
28,845 


64,889 
64,889 


55,235 
55,235 


95,000 
95,000 


95,000 
9,5,000 


141,120 

23,217 

8,663 

6,819 

179,819 


137,392 

18,311 

6,016 

18,442 

180,161 


160,438 

20,013 

7,860 

19,370 

207,681 


165,338 

22,015 

7,537 

5,120 

200,010 


395,499 


388,231 


532,036 


699,381 


CULTURE AND RECREATION 






115,899 

46,341 

1,922 

887 

165,049 


123,563 

52,456 

1?245 

18,482 

195,746 


139,204 

59,931 

1,950 

15,730 

216,815 


155,594 

66,421 

1,950 

2,190 

226,155 



-11- 



621 RECREATION AND YOUTH SERVICES: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL CULTURE & RECREATION 



081 INSURANCE: 
Unemployment 
Motor Vehicle 
Workmen's Compensation 
Package Insurance 
Public Official Bonds 
Legal Liability 
Total 

071 BENEFITS: 

Military Service Credits 
County Retirement System 
Health & Life 
Medicare 
Total 

701 DEBT SERVICE: 

Payment of Principal 
Payment of Interest 
Interest on Tax Ant. Notes 
Total 

091 OFFICE EQUIPMENT: 







FY88 * 


FY89 


FY86 


FY87 


Appro- 


Recom- 


Expended 


Expended 


priated 


mended 


41,119 


45,581 


54,605 


58,069 


14,985 


16,874 


19,397 


19,510 


729 


446 


775 


706 





1,886 


1,100 





56,833 


64,787 


75,877 


78,285 


221,882 


260,533 


292,692 


304,440 


UNCLASSIFIED 








3,440 


6,820 


5,000 


5,000 


44,374 


53,491 


48,800 


18,370 


83,161 


109,516 


60,677 


79,618 


129,618 


228,336 


112,635 


96,854 


1,584 


2,184 


3,576 


1,460 


20,075 


34,298 


35,564 


36,700 


282,252 


434,645 


266,252 


238,002 


10,677 


10,916 


14,951 


15,100 


454,863 


525,864 


330,846 


354,773 


245,049 


281,320 


103,436 


143,185 





10,699 


13,400 


17,000 


710,589 


828,799 


462,633 


530,058 


84,000 


265,000 


65,000 


24,500 


11,554 


10,017 


4,000 


1,076 





9,500 


9,500 


9,500 


95,554 


284,517 


78,500 


35,076 



3,497 



5,235 



7,600 



7,500 



013 RESERVE FUND (Transfers in appropriate budgets in prior years; funded @ $45,000 in all 
years) 42,449 45,000 



019 AUDIT FEE: 

069 BOND ISSUE COSTS: 

091 POSTAGE: 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED: 
TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET: 



25,000 27,500 




12,525 12,986 12,750 12,750 

1,104,417 1,566,182 895,184 895,886 

$4,886,238 $5,599,328 $6,021,985 $6,179,925 



*Note: FY88 reflects Reserve Fund transfers to date. 



-12- 



ARTICLE 6 

To hear and act upon the reports of the Finance Committee and of the School 
Committee relative to the School Department budget and to raise, appropriate, 
and transfer money for the ensuing year's operations; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

School Committee Chairman Jeffrey Simon moved that the Town vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $7,700,000 for the School Department Budget for 
FY89: 

For the School Department Budget: $7,700,000 

Transfer from Available Funds: 

Feoffees of the Grammar School 2,500 

Net to be raised and assessed: $7,697,500 

Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee, School Committee recom- 
mended unanimously. Motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 7 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to cover 
the Town's share of the annual operating and debt service expenses of the 
Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School District; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Whittier School Committeeman Eugene Hail son moved that the Town vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $108,885 to cover the Town's share of the 
FY89 annual operating and debt service expenses of the Whittier Regional 
Vocational Technical High School District. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 8 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 
current expenses of the Water Division, the same to be paid for by revenues 
of the Water Division during FY89, and to transfer a sum of money from the 
surplus account to Water, capital outlay, and/or debt service; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $1,077,540 for the FY89 expenses of the Water Division, the same to 
be paid for by the Water Division during FY89, and further to transfer 
$325,000 from Water Surplus to cover debt service payments of the Water 
Division for FY89. Seconded. This budget reflects the new water filtration 
plant. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. 
Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 9 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to raise and appropriate a sum of money 
and/or transfer from available funds a sum of money to pay unpaid bills 
incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid; and (2) to raise and 
appropriate a sum of money and/or to appropriate a sum of money from the 
Water Division surplus account to pay any Water Division unpaid bills 
incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Mr. Leet moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate the sum of $9,524.33 to 
pay unpaid bills incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid, viz: 

Treasurer' s Office 

Belosselsky Appellate Tax Board Case - interest $7,487.96 

-13- 



Miscellaneous Finance 

Hastings Tapley - fleet insurance $ 275.00 

Master Plan Commission 

Henderson Group - consulting services 410.00 

Fire 

Naumkeag Radiological (Gambale) - expenses 120.00 

Lahey Clinic (Gambale) - expenses 510.50 

Norman Stone, Jr. - wages 375.00 

Schools 

Theodore Sigmond - refund - expenses 99.62 

June Traylor - refund - expenses 146.25 



Total $9,524.33 

and (2) to raise this appropriation, the sum of $9,524.33 to be transferred 
from Free Cash. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unani- 
mously recommended. Motion carried on unaniomous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 10 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or to transfer from 
available funds, sums of money to fund supplements to the Town and School 
Operating Budgets for FY88 and the Water Division Operating Budget for FY88; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Engel moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate the sum of $89,632 to 
fund supplements to the Town's FY88 Operating Budget, viz: 

Miscellaneous Finance 

Health Insurance $30,000.00 

Workmen's Compensation Insurance 20,000.00 

Selectmen 

Secretary's Wages 1,954.00 

Health 

Expenses - household hazardous waste pickup 15,000.00 
Treasurer 

Expenses - cash audit 4,000.00 

Town Hall 

Capital Outlay - heating system overhaul 17,478.00 
Fire 

Capital Outlay - safety bars 1,200.00 

Total $89,632.00; 

and (2) to raise this appropriation, the sum of $89,632 to be transferred 
from Free Cash. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unani- 
mously recommended. Motion carried en unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 11 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to authorize the Treasurer, with the appro- 
val of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time, in antici- 
pation of the revenue for the financial year beginning July 01, 1988, and 
ending June 30, 1989, in accordance with the provisions of the General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 4, as amended, and to renew any note or notes as may be 

-14- 



given for a period of less than one year, in accordance with the provisions 
of the General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, as amended; and (2) to authorize 
the Treasurer, with tiie approval of the Board of Selectmen, to enter into a 
written agreement with a banking institution for the provision of banking 
services to the Town, in accordance with the provisions of Section 53F of 
Chapter 44 of the General Laws; or to take any action relative thereto. 

Mr. Elliott moved that the Town vote (1) to authorize the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time, 
in anticipation of the revenue for the financial year beginning July 1, 
1988, and ending June 30, 1989, in accordance with the provisions of the 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, as amended, and to renew any note or 
notes as may be given for a period of less than one year, in accordance with 
the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, as amended; and (2) 
to authorize the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to 
enter into a written agreement with a banking institution for the provision 
of banking services to the Town, in accordance with the provisions of 
Section 53F of Chapter 44 of the General Laws. Seconded. Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 12 

To see what action the Town will take with regard to the transfer of any 

surplus funds in the Electric Light Department. 

Mr. Engel moved that the Town vote to transfer the sum of $106,873 from the 
Surplus Account in the Electric Light Department for the purpose of reducing 
taxes. Seconded. It was mentioned that Ipswich has the cheapest power in 
the Commonwealth. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recom- 
mended. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 13 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 
purpose of promotion of the Town of Ipswich, an equal sum of money to be made 
available for said purposes from the Chamber of Commerce; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Mr. George moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$1,000 for the purpose of promotion of the Town of Ipswich, an equal sum of 
money to be made available for said purposes from the Chamber of Commerce. 
Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. 
Motion carried on unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 14 

To see if the Town will vote to distribute to its insured employees and 
retirees, after deducting the Town's total administrative cost, the balance 
of any group insurance dividend which shall be based upon the employees' pro- 
portionate share of the total premiums paid for all insurance coverages as 
stated in Chapter 32B §8A of the General Laws of The Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts; or take any other action relative thereto. (By petition.) 

Mr. Leet moved that the Town vote to place on the official ballot for the 
April 11, 1988, Elections the following question: "Shall the Town distri- 
bute to its insured employees, after deduction of the Town's total admi- 
nistrative cost, the balance of any group insurance dividend which shall be 
based upon the employees' proportionate share of the total premiums paid for 
all insurance coverages?" Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee 
unanimously supported. Motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. (On the 
ballot, the article passed with 177 in favor, 74 against.) 

-15- 



ARTICLE 15 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money to engage 
engineering services and to acquire any related materiel and/or services for 
the construction and maintenance of roads and bridges under Chapter 90 of the 
General Laws, as amended; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply 
for, to accept, and to expend any Federal and/or State grants which may be 
available for the aforementioned purposes; (3) to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or other interests(s) as may be 
necessary to effectuate said repairs, by purchase, gift, lease, eminent 
domain, or otherwise and to convey such land(s) and/or easements to Essex 
County and authorize the filing of special legislation(s) to help effectuate 
the same; and (4) to determine whether said appropriation shall be raised by 
borrowing, transfer from available funds, or otherwise; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Mr. Player moved that the Town vote: (1) to raise and appropriate the sum 
of $60,000 to engage engineering services and to acquire any related materiel 
and/or services for the construction and maintenance of roads and bridges 
under Chapter 90 of the General Laws, as amended; (2) to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to apply for, to accept, and to expend any Federal and/or State 
grants which may be available for the aforementioned purposes; and (3) to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or other 
interest(s) as may be necessary to effectuate said repairs, by purchase, 
gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise and to convey such land(s) and/or 
easements to Essex County and authorize the filing of special 
legislation(s), if necessary, to help effectuate the same. Seconded. This 
is for reconstruction of Topsfield Road. Board of Selectmen, Finance 
Committee unanimously recommended. Motion passed on unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 16 

To see if the Town will vote by ballot on April 11, 1988, on the following 
question: "Shall the Town Meeting direct the Board of Selectmen to undertake a 
study of installing traffic lights in Market Square, the scope of which study 
shall include, but not necessarily be limited to, costs; problems; and 
possible state aid; and to render a report to the voters at the April 1989 
Annual Town Meeting for action by said Town Meeting?"; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. (By petition.) 

Petitioner Jennie Szynal moved that the Town vote to place on the official 
ballot for the April 11, 1988 Election the following question: "Shall the 
Town Meeting direct the Board of Selectmen to undertake a study of 
installing traffic lights in Market Square, the scope of which study shall 
include, but not necessarily be limited to, costs; problems; and possible 
state aid; and to render a report to the voters at the April 1989 Annual 
Meeting for action by said Town Meeting?" Seconded. Pat McNally of the 
Planning Board stated that in 1984-85 the Town spent $10,000 for a study of 
downtown traffic problems. One finding was that a traffic light was 
necessary in the downtown area. The study is available; the Planning Board 
was unanimously against the article. Benjamin Fierro of the Master Plan 
Committee agreed. Board of Selectmen were 3-2 against the article; Finance 
Committee recommended putting article on the ballot. The motion failed to 
carry on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 17 

To see if the Town will vote to instruct the Board of Selectmen to retain 
Bell & Flynn, Inc., or other similarly qualified consultant, to promptly 
undertake a preliminary engineering study of the existing portion of 

-16- 



Linebrook Road running approximately from Howe Street to Old Right Road. 
This study shall involve (a) limited field survey to measure the existing 
certerline profile and selected critical cross-sections; (b) preparation of a 
preliminary roadway design utilizing recommended 30 mph design standards; and 
(c) preparation of construction cost estimates for this design. This design 
shall also endeavor to accommodate a 30 foot pavement width, adequate 
drainage system and sidewalk on the north side, all within, or as close as 
possible to, the existing right-of-way. This study shall be completed and 
its results reported to the Finance Committee on or before June 30, 1988. 
This shall be paid for using a portion of the appropriation approved under 
Article 14 of the 1987 Annual Town Meeting; or take any other action 
with respect thereto. (By petition.) 

Carl Gardner moved that the Town vote to instruct the Board of Selectmen, 
acting through the Town Manager, to retain Bell & Flynn, Inc., to promptly 
undertake a preliminary engineering study of the existing portion of 
Linebrook Road running approximately from Howe Street to Old Right Road. 
This study shall involve (a) limited field survey to measure the existing 
centerline profile and selected critical cross-sections; (b) preparation of 
a preliminary roadway design utilizing recommended 30 mph design standards; 
and (c) preparation of construction cost estimates for this design. This 
design shall also endeavor, to accommodate a 30-foot pavement width, ade- 
quate drainage system and sidewalk on the north side, all within, or as 
close as possible to, the existing right-of-way. This study shall be 
completed and its results reported to the Board of Selectmen and Finance 
Committee on or before June 30, 1988. The cost shall not exceed $6,500 and 
shall be paid for using a portion of the appropriation approved under 
Article 14 of the 1987 Annual Town Meeting Warrant. Seconded. Mr. George 
stated that the Board of Selectmen were 3-2 against the article; the Town 
Engineer recommends the present plan voted by Town Meetings over the last 
several years. The Finance Committee unanimously supported the article. 
Member Allen Swan reminded that the Conservation Commission had denied 
the Town permission to build the road through wetlands; the Zoning Board of 
Appeals had denied a variance to construct the road. In the private sector, 
developers get their permits before starting; the Town did it backwards. 
Mr. Engel spoke in favor of the article, feeling the DEQE will probably deny 
the Willowdale route, and urged acceptance of the article. The question was 
moved, and the motion carried on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 18 

To see if the Town will vote to amend or revise any of the appropriations 
approved under previous Annual Town Meeting Articles listed below. Said 
Articles pertain to the engagement of engineering services and acquisition of 
any related materiel and/or services for the construction and maintenance of 
roads and bridges under Chapter 90 of the General Laws, as amended, and, more 
specifically, deal with the reconstruction/realignment of that portion of 
Linebrook Road running approximately between Howe Street and Old Right Road: 

Article 15 1984 Annual Town Meeting $65,500 

Article 12 1985 Annual Town Meeting $65,000 

Article 13 1986 Annual Town Meeting $428,000 

Article 14 1987 Annual Town Meeting ' $455,150 

Total $1,013,650 

or take any other action with respect thereto. (By petition.) 

-17- 



Mr. Gardner moved that the Town vote to abandon and discontinue the spe- 
cified purpose of Article 14 of the 1987 Town Meeting under the provisions 
of General Law, Chapter 44, #20 and to: Revoke the portion of the 
appropriation authorized under said article in the amount of $150,000, which 
was transferred from Overlay Surplus and to transfer said sum ($150,000) to 
Surplus. Seconded. Lawrence Pzenny stated that the Finance Committee was 
unanimously against, and suggested it would be more appropriate to reduce 
the bonding issue. Mr. Engel said the Board of Selectmen were unanimously 
against the article. The motion failed on a voice vote; seven voters stood 
and requested a hand count. On it, the motion failed 13 to 126. 

ARTICLE 19 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money to engage 
engineering services and to acquire any related materiel and/or services for 
the repair of town-owned and maintained bridges; (2) to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to apply for, accept, and expend any Federal and/or State grants 
which may be available for the aforementioned purposes; (3) to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or other interest(s) as may 
be necessary to effectuate said repairs, by purchase, gift, lease, eminent 
domain, or otherwise; and (4) to determine whether said appropriation shall 
be raised by borrowing, transfer from available funds, or otherwise; or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Player moved that the Town vote: (1) to raise and appropriate a sum of 
$60,000 to engage engineering services and to acquire any related materiel 
and/or services for the repair of Town-owned and maintained bridges; (2) to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept, and expend any 
Federal and/or State grants which may be available for the aforementioned 
purposes; and (3) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire such ease- 
ments and/or other interest(s) as may be necessary to effectuate said 
repairs, by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise. Seconded. 
This is to repair the Winthrop Street Bridge, damaged in flood of April 
1987; Hamilton will share the cost. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee 
unanimously recommended. Motion carried on voice vote unanimously. 

ARTICLE 20 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell 
and convey certain parcels of land in the areas of Newburyport Turnpike 
(Assessor's Maps 38 and 38C, Parcels 4 and 5); and Pineswamp Road (Assessor's 
Map 41A, Parcel 3A); each, respectively, for a minimum purchase price 
established by Town Meeting; provided that the buyer(s) shall pay all 
closing, legal and engineering costs incurred with preparation for and 
closing of the conveyance(s); or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. George moved to indefinitely postpone. Seconded. Unanimous voice 
vote. 

ARTICLE 21 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to appropriate a sum of money to acquire a 
certain parcel of land situate near High Street (Assessor's Map 30B, Parcel 
5), or a portion thereof, for the purpose of developing affordable housing 
under the Massachusetts Housing Partnership Program and to convey said land 
to the Ipswich Housing Authority; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire said land by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain or otherwise; (3) 
to raise this appropriation by authorizing the Treasurer, with the approval 

-18- 



of the Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial notes under the provi- 
sions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7(3); and (4) to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the School Committee to sell and con- 
vey, for a minimum purchase price to be established by Town Meeting, to 
Foster Way Realty Trust, its heirs, successors or assigns, an utility easement 
over land under jurisdiction of the School Committee in the area of School 
Street (Assessor's Map 30B, Parcel 6) for roadway, drainage and other utili- 
ties, the location and installation of which shall be subject to the review 
and approval of the School Committee, Water and Sewer Commissioners, Town 
Engineer, and other applicable boards; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Mr. George moved that the Town vote to place on the official ballot of the 
April 11, 1988 Election the following question: "Shall the Town vote (1) to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $260,000 to acquire a certain parcel of land 
situate near High Street (Assessor's Map 30B, Parcel 5), or a portion 
thereof, for the purpose of developing affordable housing under the 
Massachusetts Housing Partnership Program, and to obtain any and all services 
incidental thereto, and to convey said land to the Ipswich Housing Authority; 
(2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire said land by purchase, 
gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; (3) to raise this appropriation by 
authorizing the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to 
issue $260,000 in bonds or serial notes under the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7(3); and (4) to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to sell and convey, for the minimum purchase price of $1,000, to 
Foster Way Realty Trust, its heirs, successors, or assigns, an easement over 
land under jurisdiction of the School Committee in the area of School Street 
(Assessor's Map 30B, Parcel 6) for roadway, drainage and other utilities 
shall be subject to review by and approval of the School Committee, the Water 
and Sewer Commissioners and the Town Engineer?" Seconded. School 
Committeeman Lawrence Seidler moved to amend the main motion by inserting 
after the words "Board of Selectmen" in subparagraph 4, the words "only after 
the prior approval of the School Committee". Seconded. The Finance 
Committee was not in favor of the amendment; the Selectmen were against the 
amendment. Mr. Seidler stated the School Committee felt it must exercise its 
responsibility to protect school property. Angelo Perna said that the High 
School could use the land for sports; the owner, Mr. Pappas, had been asked 
to donate the land but had not, and he felt it should be taken by eminent 
domain; he asked that both the motion and the amendment be defeated. Betty 
Slatko of Ipswich Housing Parternship urged a "yes" vote. Marian Reedy of 
Kimball Avenue spoke against the article, stating that the abutters have not 
been shown any plans, that people had the impression that Ipswich residents 
would have first priority on affordable housing but she had been told that 
minorities had first priority, veterans second, and then residents. Ernest 
Corbin and Matthew Kozazcki spoke against the article; Sara O'Connor and Carl 
Gardner in favor. Question was moved. The amendment carried on a voice 
vote. The main motion as amended carried on a voice vote, which was 
questioned; on a hand count, the motion failed 126 to 148. 

ARTICLE 22 

To hear and act upon reports of the committees, and to continue such commit- 
tees as the Town may vote to continue. 

Mary Conley asked that a new Historic District Study Committee be appointed, 
apart from the Ipswich Historical Commission, as the Commission feels that 
there may be a question of legality and als.o the duties of the Commission are 

-19- 



taking up all its time and effort. The Study Committee asked that its 
report be accepted and it be continued, but only until a new Committee is 
appointed. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

James Berry asked that the report of the Commuter Rail Committee be accepted, 
and the Committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Benjamin Fierro asked that the report of the Master Plan Committee be 
accepted, and the Committee be continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Terri Stephens asked that the report of the Hall -Haskell Committee be 
accepted, and the Committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 23 



To see if the Town will vote to increase the membership of the Hall -Haskell 
Committee, as established under Article 44 of the April 06, 1981, Annual Town 
Meeting, from five members appointed by the Moderator for one-year terms, to^ 
nine members appointed by the Moderator for one-year terms; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Terri Stephens moved that the Town vote to increase membership of the Hal 1 - 
Haskell Committee, as established under Article 44 of the April 6, 1981 
Annual Town .Meeting, from five members appointed by the Moderator for one- 
year terms, to nine members appointed by the Moderator for one-year terms, 
and to rescind any and all prior inconsistent requirements. Seconded. Board 
of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion carried on a 
unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 24 



To see if the Town will vote to amend the "PROTECTIVE ZONING BY-LAW OF THE 
TOWN OF IPSWICH" by (1) adding to "SECTION V.D. TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS," 
under column heading "ACCESSORY USE" the following: 

RRA RRB IR B I 



"STORAGE TRAILERS - Temporary Use P(12) P(12) P(12) P(12) P(12) 
STORAGE TRAILERS - Permanent Use — - — - — - — - — -;" 

(2) adding to "SECTION V.D. TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS— FOOTNOTES TO USE 
REGULATIONS—" the following: 

"12. 'STORAGE TRAILERS - Temporary Use' shall refer to use which is inci- 
dental to a temporary situation, i.e., a construction project, temporary 
storage of goods and materiel following a fire or other calamity. The 
Building Inspector shall issue a permit for such a temporary use. In no 
event shall the temporary use exceed twelve (12) months after the issuance 
of the permit. 'STORAGE TRAILERS-Permanent Use' shall refer to all other 
uses of storage trailers for the express purpose of keeping and main- 
taining goods or materiel."; and 

(3) adding to " SECTION III. DEFINITIONS " the following: 

"STORAGE TRAILER: Any structure or piece of equipment, not especially 
designed or used for residential occupancy or recreational use, having an 
interior volume of more than one thousand (1,000) cubic feet, built upon, 
or having, a frame or chassis to which wheels may be, or have been, 
attached and by which it may be, or was at one time moved, upon a street, 
whether or not such entity actually has at any given time had such wheels 
attached; is not normally used for commercial transport at least once eyery 
ninety (90) days and is used for the temporary or permanent safekeeping of 
goods and materiel." ; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

-20- 



James Barney of the Master Plan commission moved that the Town vote to amend 
THE PROTECTIVE ZONING BY-LAW OF THE TOWN OF IPSWICH as presented in Article 
24 of the Warrant for the April 4, 1988?) Annual Town Meeting, with the 
following correction: under part ' (3) Addition to "SECTION III. DEFINITIONS",' 
third line from the end, by inserting a period following the word 

"transport" and by deleting the balance of the words from "at least materiel 

so that part 3 now reads: 

'(3) adding to "SECTION III. DEFINITIONS" the following: 

"STORAGE TRAILER: Any structure or piece of equipment, not espe- 
cially designed or used for residential occupancy or recreational 
use, having any interior volume of more than one thousand (1,000) 
cubic feet, built upon, or having a frame or chassis to which 
wheels may be, or have been, attached and by which it may be, or 
was at one time moved, upon a street, whether or not such entity 
actually has at any given time had such wheels attached; or is not 
normally used for commercial transport." 1 . 
Seconded. Permission of the Building Inspector and/or Zoning Board of 
Appeals would be necessary. Benjamin Fierro said this is for permanent 
storage only. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee, Planning Board recom- 
mended unanimously. Motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 25 

To see if the Town will vote pursuant to the provisions of Section 15C of 
Chapter 40 of the General Laws to designate the following roads, or portions 
of roads, as "scenic roads": Mill Road, Linebrook Road from the intersection 
of School Street to the intersection of the Newburyport Turnpike, and 
Topsfield Road from the intersection of Kennedy Drive westerly to the 
Topsfield town line; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Gardner moved that the Town vote pursuant to the provisions of Section 
15C of Chapter 40 of the General Laws to designate the following roads, or 
portions of roads, as "scenic roads": Mill Road, Linebrook Road from the 
intersection of School Street to the intersection of Newburyport Turnpike, 
and Topsfield Road from the intersection of Kennedy Drive westerly to the 
Topsfield town line. Seconded. Planning Board approval must be obtained to 
do any work on a scenic road; the law applies only to stone walls and trees 
on public ways. Mr. Elliott moved that the motion before the Meeting be 
amended in the following manner; Change "Linebrook Road from the intersec- 
tion of School Street to the intersection of Howe Street". Seconded. Board 
of Selectmen 3-2 against the original article; unanimously in favor of amend- 
ment. Finance Committee supported both; Planning Board was against original 
4-0, against amendment 3-0. The question was moved, the voice vote on the 
amendment was inconclusive; on a hand count the amendment carried 126 to 67. 
The motion as amended carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 26 



To see if the Town will vote to amend the "PROTECTIVE ZONING BY-LAW OF THE 

TOWN OF IPSWICH" by (1) deleting " SECTION VII. OFF-STREET PARKING AND 

LOADING REGULATIONS " in its entirety; and (2) adding the following new sec- 
tion in lieu thereof: 

"SECTION V.II. OFF-STREET PARKING AND LOADING REGULATIONS 

A. Purpose 

The purpose of this section is to ensure that all uses be provided with 
sufficient off-street parking and loading facilities to meet the needs of 

-21- 



persons employed at or having commerce at such uses; to ensure that off- 
street parking and loading facilities are designed so as to reduce hazards 
to pedestrians and drivers; to reduce congestion in the streets; to reduce 
nuisance to abuttors from noise, fumes and headlight glare; to reduce 
environmental deterioration to surrounding neighborhoods resulting from 
the glare, heat, dust, accelerated storm water run-off and unattractive 
views. 



B. Parking Requirements 

Total automobile storage or parking space per principal use shall be pro- 
vided in accordance with the standards set forth in the Table of Minimum 
Parking Requirements herein below: 

TABLE OF MINIMUM PARKING REQUIREMENTS 



Principal Use 



Residential Uses 

a. Residence 

b. Hotel , Motel , Inn 
Institutional Uses 



c. Hospital 



d. Nursing Home, Conval.Home 

e. Theatre, Auditorium, 
Stadium or place of 
assembly 

f. Philanthropic (Community, 
recreation centers & 
museums ) 

g. Educational 

1. nursery, day-care 

2. school 



Business Uses 
h. Retail Store/Business and 
Consumer Service (exclud- 
ing professional office 
and clinic) 



Required Parking Spaces 



One and one-half (1±) spaces per 

dwelling unit. 

One (1) space per rental unit. 



One (1) space per two (2) beds 
plus three (3) spaces per staff 
doctor plus one (1) space per other 
employee on the largest shift. 
One (1) space per two (2) beds. 
One (1) space for every four (4) 
seats to maximum rated capacity 
of the facility. 

One (1) space per two hundred and 
fifty (250) square feet of gross 
floor area 



One (1) space 
one (1) space 
One (1) space 
therein plus 
two employees 
than teachers 
or place of a 
(1) space for 
maximum rated 



per staff person plus 

per classroom. 

for each classroom 
one (1) space for each 

or staff positions other 
; and where an auditorium 
ssembly is provided, one 

every four (4) seats to 

capacity of the facility, 



One (1) space per three hundred (300) 
feet of gross floor area on the ground 
floor plus one (1) space per five nun- 
red (50O> square feet of gross floor 
area on all other floors. 



-22- 



i. Restaurant, Club or Dance 
Hall 



j. Clinic and Professional 

Offices 
k. Funeral Establishment 



1. Repair Shop and Building 
Trade 

m. Auto Service Station and 
Auto Body Shop 



n. Motor Vehicle, Trailer, 
Boat Sales & Rentals 



o. Manufacturing & Other 
Industrial Uses 

p. Wholesale, Distribution and 
Storage in Enclosed Build- 
ings, and Warehouses 



q. Open Storage, or Other 
Open Air Uses 



One (1) space for each one hundred 
(100) square feet of gross floor area 
or one (1) space per three (3) seats 
rated to capacity, plus one (1) 
space per employee on the largest 
shift, whichever is greater. 
One (1) space per three hundred (300) 
square feet of gross floor area. 
One (1) space per four (4) persons 
based on rated maximum capacity of 
facility. 

One (1) space per employee on largest 
shift plus one (1) space for each company 
vehicle kept on the premises. 
Three (3) spaces per repair bay, plus 
one (1) space per employee on largest 
shift, plus one (1) space per company 
vehicle kept on the premises. 
One (1) space per fifteen hundred 
(1,500) square feet of gross floor 
area of indoor space, plus one 
(1) space per employee on the largest 
shift. 

One (1) space for every five hundred 
(500) square feet of gross floor area. 
One (1) space for every one thousand 
(1,000) square feet of gross floor 
area for up to the first ten thousand 
(10,000) square feet of gross floor 
area, plus one (1) space for every addi- 
tional five thousand (5,000) square 
feet of gross floor area. 
One (1) space for every one thousand 
(1,000) square feet of the lot devoted 
to the use thereon. 



C. Change of Use or Building Expansions 

Where a structure is enlarged or a change in an existing use occurs, 
only the additional parking space required need comply with the standard 
set forth in this section. 

D. Accessory Use of Parking Areas 

No parking area shall be used for any activity which interferes with its 
availability to meet the parking need it is required to serve. Only 
accessory uses, as provided for in this section, are permitted. Accessory 
uses may include, but not be limited to, necessary traffic directional signs 
not exceeding two (2) square feet each in area, necessary lighting fixtures 
for illuminating the parking area, and landscaping within the buffer areas. 

E. Joint Use of Parking Areas 

By special permit of the Board designated under the Zoning By-law 
(hereinafter the "Board"), otherwise by the Zoning Board of Appeals, joint 
use'may be made of required parking spaces by intermittent use establishments 
such as churches, assembly halls, or theaters, whose peak parking demand does 
not conflict with that of the other use. A formal agreement shall be made in 



•23- 



writing by the owner of the uses involved concerning: the number of spaces 
involved; substantiation of the fact that such joint use is not overlapping 
or in conflict; and the duration of the agreement. The agreement must be 
presented with the petition for special permit. 

F. Fractional Numbers 

Where the computation of required parking spaces results in a fractional 
number, only the fraction of one-half or more shall be counted as one. 

G. Mixed Use Facilities 

Buildings or lots which contain more than one principal use are con- 
sidered Mixed Use Facilities. For the purpoes of determining parking 
rquirements for such a facility, each use component shall be counted as a 
separate principal use. 

H. Location of Parking Facilities 

All required parking or loading spaces shall be provided on the same par- 
cel of land occupied by the use or building to which it is appurtenant; 
provided, however, that if sufficient spaces are unavailable on that par- 
cel, the Board may authorize by special permit an alternative location 
for non-residential parking subject to the following provisions. 

1. The property to be occupied as parking shall be in the same legal 
interest as the facility served either by deed, by easement, or by long- 
term lease which shall be no less than thirty (30) years in duration. If 
the property is leased, the terms of the lease shall be subject to the 
Board's approval as to form and duration. Such deed, easement or notice 
of lease shall be recorded at the Registry of Deeds and a recorded copy 
of the same shall be filed with and made part of the application for a 
building or occupancy permit. 

2. The distance between the use or building and its parking area shall 
not be more than three hundred (300) feet. 

3. The separated parking area shall not create unreasonable traffic 
congestion or create a hazard to pedestrians being served by the 
parking. 

4. The parking area shall be located on property zoned for the same or 
less restrictive use as the principal use being served by the 
parking. 

I. Loading Requirements 

Minimum off-street loading requirements shall hereafter be required in accor- 
dance with the standards set forth below for e^ery new structure or develop- 
ment of a new use and for an enlargement of an existing structure or change 
in an existing use. Where the structure is enlarged and/or there is a change 
in the existing use, the standards shall apply only to the enlargement and/or 
change. 

Off-street loading areas shall be provided in accordance with the TABLE 
OF LOADING REQUIREMENTS as outlined below: 

-24- 



TABLE OF LOADING REQUIREMENTS 



USE 



SQ. FT. OF GROSS FLOOR AREA 



Wholesale, Distribution, 
Storage & Industrial Uses 



Retail, Hotel and 

Restaurant 

Office, Institution & 

Public Buildings 



Residential 
Multi-fami ly* 



1-10 



(In Thousands of Square Feet) 
11-20 21-40 41-80 81 & Over 
I~~ 2 3 Add. space 

per each 
increment 
of 40. 
2 Additional space per each 

increment of 20. 
112 Add. space 

per each 
increment 
of 100. 

1 Additional space per each 

increment of 100. 



*The Board may approve by special permit an alternative to the required number 
of loading spaces noted above. 

J. Design Standards for Parking Facilities 

The minimum dimensions of parking spaces and maneuvering aisles shall be as 
follows: 



A. Parting mnft* 

B. Still WldU 



C DUUaca W Hall 
to curb 



O. Ai*U vMia 

E. Curt toifik per or 



r-EH 



-B- 



n 



A 



D Tr.fTlc AIjU 




B 

D Tndlc AUk 



r<r«IM Pkf 



Parking 
Angle 
(A) 
(degrees) 


Stall 
Width 
(B)« 


Stall 

Oepth 

(Ox 


Aisle 

Width 

(0) 


Curb 
Length 
(E) 


1-way 


2-way 


0* 


9'-0- 


NA 


12 ' -0" 




24' -0" 


23 •-(>• 


30* 


9'-0" 


17 '-4" 


11 ' -0" 




NA 


18 ' -0" 


45* 


9'-0" 


19'-10" 


13'-0' 




NA 


12' -9* 


«>• 


9--0- 


21--0- 


18--0- 




NA 


10 '-6- 


70* 


9'-0- 


21'-0" 


19'-0" 




NA 


9*-9- 


80* 


9*-0" 


20'-4- 


24--0' 




NA 


9--1- 


90 # 


9'-0" 


19' -0" 


25' -0" 




25' -0- 


9'-0* 



•End spaces, restricted on one of the long sides by curbs, wills, fences, or 
other similar obstructions, shall have a minimum width of ten (10) feet, and 
maneuvering space at the aisle end of at least five (S) feet In depth and nine 
(9) feet In width. 

xMay Include no more than two feet of landscaped Island or setback area at the 
front of the space, provided there are no obstructions to the vehicle's bumper 
overhang and provided, further, that the bumper overhang does not Interfere with 
the availability of the Island or setback area for snow storage. 



-25- 



K. Loading Space Dimensions 

Each loading space shall be at least twelve (12) feet in width by sixty (60) 
feet in length, and shall be provided with a fourteen (14) foot high 
clearance. This space shall be exclusive of drives, aisles, or maneuvering 
space. 

L. Parking and Loading Space Layout 

1. Circulation - Driveways and parking areas shall be designed with due 
regard to topography, integration with surrounding streets, general interior 
circulation, and separation of pedestrian and vehicular traffic to reduce 
hazards to pedestrians and motorists. 

2. Layout - Required parking and loading facilities shall be laid out so 
that each vehicle may proceed to and from its parking space without requiring 
the movement of any other vehicle. The Board may waive this requirement for 
parking facilities under full-time attendant supervision. 

In no case shall parking or loading spaces be located so as to require 
the backing or maneuvering of a vehicle onto a sidewalk or onto a public 
way in order to enter or leave the space. 

3. No open parking or loading space shall be located less than ten (10) feet 
from any side or rear lot line excluding corner lots, as provided for under 
paragraph L.4. below. 

4. No parking of motor vehicles or driveway serving a parking or loading 
facility shall be located within thirty (30) feet of an intersection of 
two street lines. 

5. Except in the Industrial district, no off-street parking facility 

shall be located within a front yard setback. No off-street loading facility 
shall be located within a front yard in any district. 

M. Handicapped Parking 

Parking facilities shall provide specially-designed parking spaces for the 
physically handicapped in accordance with the Rules and Regulations of the 
Architectural Access Board of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Department 
of Public Safety. 

Handicapped spaces shall be clearly identified by signs indicating that the 
spaces are reserved for physically handicapped persons. Such spaces shall 
be located nearest to the handicapped entrance to the use or building 
served. 

N. Surfacing, Drainage and Curbing 

All parking facilities shall be graded, surfaced with asphalt, concrete, or 
similar, non-erosive material, and drained in an adequate manner to prevent 
nuisance of erosion or excessive water flow across public ways or abutting 
properties. 

Entrance and exit driveways shall be defined clearly with curbing, signs, 
and pavement markings. Parking and loading spaces shall be marked clearly 
in accordance with dimensions specified in subsections J, K, and M above. 

0. Landscaping 

In order to separate parking areas from abutting streets, to provide areas 
for disposal of snow, and to provide visual relief from expanses of pavement 
and vehicles, landscaping shall be provided in all parking areas containing 
ten (10) or more parking spaces. Landscaping shall be subject to the appro- 
val of the Board, as applicable. 

-26- 



P. Lighting 

All lighting within parking areas shall be arranged so as to prevent direct 
glare upon any public way or upon any other abutting property. Lighting 
shall be provided, where necessary, to improve safety and visibility of the 
lot. 

Q. Maintenance 

Parking and loading facilities and landscaping shall be continuously main- 
tained in good condition to ensure continued compliance with the provisions 
of this section."; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. McNally moved that the Town vote to amend the "PROTECTIVE ZONING BY-LAW 
OF THE TOWN OF IPSWICH" as presented in Article 26 of the Warrant for the 
April 4, 1988 Annual Town Meeting, and as corrected by the copy of the 
article filed on April 4, 1988, with the Town Moderator and the Town Clerk, 
and available upon request by any member of the Town Meeting. Seconded. The 
Planning Board was 4-0 in favor of amending Section VII "Off-Street Parking 
and Loading Regulations" by deleting it in its entirety and adding a new sec- 
tion. The Finance Committee was unanimously opposed; Mr. Jewell asked if 
this would apply if a resident needed a building permit to do anything to his 
home. Mr. McNally stated that single residences would be exempted. Board of 
Selectmen 3-2 in favor. On a voice vote, the Moderator ruled that article 
failed. It was questioned, and on a hand count, the motion failed 73 to 82. 

ARTICLE 27 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Map of the Town of Ipswich, 
Massachusetts, by redesignating from Industrial to Business the property located 
at Two (2) Depot Square, Ipswich, Massachusetts, (Assessor's Map 41B, Parcel 
216); or take any other action relative thereto. (By petition.) 

David Grimes moved that the Town vote to amend the Zoning Map of the Town of 
Ipswich, Massachusetts, by redesignating from Industrial to Business the pro- 
perty located at Two (2) Depot Square, Ipswich, Massachusetts (Assessor's Map 
41B, Parcel 216). Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recom- 
mended unanimously; Planning Board recommended. Motion carried on a unani-* 
mous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 28 



To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to purchase 
storm drainage material and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire storm 
drainage easements by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise, on par 
eels of land in the area of Argilla Road, with the metes and bounds descriptions 
being set forth in the written descriptions on file with the Town Clerk and the 
Town Moderator; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Elliott moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$20,000 to purchase storm drainage material and related materiel and ser- 
vices, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire storm drainage 
easements by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise, on parcels 
of land in the area of Argilla Road, with the metes and bounds descriptions 
being set forth in the written descriptions on file with the Town Clerk and 
the Town Moderator. Seconded. Mr. Gardner questioned the money figure and 
the Town Manager explained the various costs for pipes, catch basins, 
grading, land damages, etc. The owners of Heartbreak Hill have contributed 
$4700 worth of pipe. Mr. Teele, owner of one of the properties, said that he 
has had water problems for the last ten years or more and has had to replace 
his septic tank twice; he urged approval of the article. The Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Motion carried on a unanimous 
voice vote. 

-27- 



ARTICLE 29 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell and con- 
vey to the First National Bank of Ipswich, for a minimum price established by 
Town Meeting, a storm drainage easement across land of the Town in the area of 
the downtown municipal parking lot (Assessor's Map 42A, Parcel 226), the metes 
and bounds description of which is on file with the Town Clerk and the Town 
Moderator; provided that the grantee shall pay all closing, legal and engineering 
costs incurred in conjunction with preparation for and closing of the conveyance; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Engel moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell and 
convey to the First National Bank of Ipswich, for a minimum price of $100, a storm 
drainage easement across land of the Town in the area of the downtown municipal 
parking lot (Assessor's Map 42A, Parcel 226), the metes and bounds description of 
which is on file with the Town Clerk and the Town Moderator; provided that the 
grantee shall pay all closing, legal and engineering costs incurred in conjunction 
with preparation for the closing of the conveyance. Seconded. Mr. Gardner stated 
that he understood the work has already been done and completed (by a vote of the 
Board of Selectmen). He also questioned the hazardous materials dug up by the 
bank. Town Counsel Charles Dalton stated that the Charter provides that the Town 
Manager is in charge of all real property of the Town and has the right to allow 
the work done; Mr. Dalton did not feel it was a serious matter. Mr. Gardner felt 
Town Meeting should have the right to approve. Board of Selectmen unanimously 
recommended, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Motion carried on a voice 
vote. 

ARTICLE 30 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 37A, which increases the exemp- 
tion on real estate taxes of the legally and totally blind; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. (By petition.) 

Mr. Player moved that the Town vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 59, Secton 5, Clause 37A, which increases the exemption on 
real estate taxes of the legally and totally blind. Seconded. Mr. Player stated 
that the bottom line to the Town would be $500-600. Motion carried unanimously on 
a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 31 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 5A, to exempt from taxation the 
real and personal estate of any incorporated organizations of veterans of any 
war in which the United States has been engaged; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. (By petition.) 

Charles Passales moved that the Town vote to accept the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 5A, to exempt from taxa- 
tion the real and personal estate of any incorporated organizations of veterans of 
any war in which the United States has been engaged. Seconded. Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended unanimously. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 32 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to continue the position of Town Planner for 
another year; and (2) to raise and appropriate the sum of $33,300 for the 
salary of the Town Planner; or to take any other action relative thereto. 
(By petition. ) 

Barbara Ostberg moved that the article be indefinitely postponed. Seconded. 
Unanimous voice vote. 

-28- 



ARTICLE 33 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell and 
convey, for a minimum purchase price established by Town Meeting, a certain 
parcel of land situate in the area of Cameron Avenue (Assessor's Map 31D, 
Parcel 62A), subject to the following conditions: (a) that the sale shall be 
subject to a covenant that as a result of the sale no increase in density of 
buildings and/or dwelling units may be permitted than otherwise would be per- 
mitted on the lot(s) prior to the said sale; and (b) the buyer shall pay all 
closing, legal and engineering costs incurred in conjunction with preparation 
for and closing of the conveyance; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Player moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell 
and convey, for a minimum purchase price of $5,000, a certain parcel of land 
situate in the area of Cameron Avenue (Assessor's Map 31D, Parcel 62A) (a descrip- 
tion of which is on file with the Town Clerk and the Town Moderator), subject to 
the following conditions: (a) that the sale shall be subject to a covenant and/or 
a deed restriction that as a result of the sale no increase in density of 
buildings and/or dwelling units may be permitted than otherwise would be permitted 
on the abutting lot(s) prior to said sale; and (b) the buyer shall pay all closing, 
legal and engineering costs incurred in conjunction with preparation for and 
closing of the conveyance. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee 
recommended. Motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 34 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Library Trustees to 
apply for a grant from the Commonwealth under the provisions of Chapter 478 
of the Acts of 1987 ("The Library Improvement Act") and to encourage the 
Trustees to expend monies from the Trust funds under their jurisdiction to 
prepare plans and specifications for an addition to the Ipswich Public 
Library; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Library Trustees Chairman Crocker Snow moved that the Town vote to authorize the 
Board of Library Trustees to apply for a grant from the Commonwealth under the 
provisions of Chapter 78, Sections 19G to 19K, inclusive, of the General Law ("The 
Library Improvement Act") and to encourage the Trustees to expend monies from the 
Trust funds under their jurisdiction to prepare plans and specifications for an 
addition to the Ipswich Public Library. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance 
Committee, Library Trustees, recommended unanimously. 

ARTICLE 35 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to acquire by gift and/or purchase for con- 
servation purposes and/or watershed protection, to be held in the care and 
custody of the Conservation Commission under General Laws, Chapter 40, 
Section 8C, certain parcels of land including the improvements thereon, 
generally described as follows: Two parcels of land containing a total of 
25.9 acres, more or less, as shown on the Town of Ipswich Assessor's Map 19B, 
Lot 5 and Map 19D, Lot 4, now or formerly owned by Elizabeth A. Hicken. For 
title to the above property, see Essex South Registry of Deeds, Book 339, 
Page 490 and Essex Probate Court docket 349356; (2) to appropriate a sum of 
money to acquire said land and to obtain appraisals and engineering and legal 
services necessary and incidental thereto; (3) to authorize the acquisition 
of sai-d land by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; (4) to 
determine whether said appropriation shall be raised by taxation, transfer 
from available funds, or by borrowing; and (5) to authorize Town officials to 
apply for and accept federal and/or state grants and to enter into contracts 
or agreements with state and/or federal agencies for this purpose; or to take 
any other action relative. 

-29- 



Conservation Commission Chairman Lillian North moved that the Town vote (1) to 
acquire by gift and/or purchase for conservation purposes and/or watershed protec- 
tion, to be held in the care and custody of the Conservation Commission under 
General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 8C, certain parcels of land including the improve 
ments thereon, generally described as follows: Two parcels of land containing a 
total of 25.9 acres, more or less, as shown on the Town of Ipswich Assessor's Map 
19B, Lot 5 and Map 19D, Lot 4, now or formerly owned by Elizabeth A. Hicken. For 
title to the above property, see Essex South Registry of Deeds, Book 339, Page 490 
and Essex Probate Court docket 349356; (2) to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$104,000 to acquire said land and to obtain appraisals and engineering and legal 
services necessary and incidental thereto; (3) to authorize the acquisition of 
said land by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; and (4) to 
authorize town officials to apply for and accept Federal and/or State grants and 
to enter into contracts or agreements with State and/or Federal agencies for this 
purpose. Seconded. This property is wooded upland at the base of Prospect Hill 
in Dow's watershed; the Town would keep it in open, natural state in perpetuity, 
to be named for Mrs. Hicken's late husband Guy Hicken. It could have archeologi- 
cal importance; would be used for passive recreation. A State grant may be 
available. Board of Selectmen, Conservation Commission recommended; Finance 
Committee 6-2 in favor. Motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 36 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-laws of the Town of 
Ipswich, Chapter XV, "MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS FOR PUBLIC ORDER AND SAFETY," 
Section 4, Operation of Motor Boats," by (1) deleting subsection (e) in its 
entirety and redesignating subsection (f) as subsection (e); and (2) by 
inserting in the first sentence of subsection (a) the word "headway" so that 
said sentence reads: 

"(a) It shall be unlawful to operate or cause to be operated any motor 

boat or other vessel propelled by an internal combustion engine at a 
headway speed exceeding five miles per hour in any of the following 
waters in the Town of Ipswich."; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Mr. Leet moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 37 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-laws of the Town of 
Ipswich, CHAPTER XV. "MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS FOR PUBLIC ORDER AND SAFETY" 
by adding a new Section 14 as follows: 

" Section 14. Street Numbers Posted for All Buildings 

A. It shall be the duty of e^/ery owner and/or occupant of each house, 
building, and/or structure with the Town of Ipswich to place thereon 
the number of said house, building, or structure. 

B. The size, color, location, and visibility of said numbers shall be 
as follows: 

1. The minimum height of said number shall be three and one-half 
(3i) inches in height. 

2. In order to be visible from the road, street, or way, the number 
shall be of a contrasting color. 

3. The number shall be affixed to the front door or as close to 
the front door as possible. 

-30- 



4. Where there are multiple houses, buildings, or structures located 
off the road on private ways, private roads, or private lanes, the 
numbers shall be placed at the following locations: 

(a) The numbers shall be affixed to a post at the entrance to said 
private way, private road, or private lane. 

(b) If the house, building, or structure is so far off the private 
way causing the numbers to be unidentifiable from the private 
way, then a post with the numbers affixed thereto shall be 
placed at the entrance of the driveway leading to the house, 
building or structure."; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Leet moved that the Town vote to amend the General By-laws of the Town of 
Ipswich, CHAPTER XV. "MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS FOR PUBLIC ORDER AND SAFETY" as 
presented in Article 37 of the Warrant for the April 4, 1988 Annual Town Meeting, 
with the following amendment: Subsection B-l shall read as follows: "1. The 
minimum height of said number shall be three (3) inches in height." Seconded. 
Board of Selectmen recommend unanimously, Finance Committee 6-2 in favor. Motion 
carried on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 38 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the General By-Laws of The Town Of 
Ipswich, "CHAPTER II. ORGANIZATION AND POWERS OF TOWN MEETINGS," " Section 4 . 
Quorum " by deleting the first sentence thereof and by substituting in lieu 
thereof the following sentence: "The presence of one hundred fifty (150) 
registered voters of the Town at any Town Meeting shall be required to 
constitute a quorum, except for a motion to adjourn for which no quorum shall 
be required; provided, however, that no vote carrying the expenditure or 
appropriation of any sum of money shall be held to be invalid by reason of 
lack of the required quorum, unless it appears from the records of the Town 
Clerk that before the result of such vote was declared the question of the 
presence of a quorum was duly raised and that such record shows that the 
required quorum was lacking."; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. George moved that the Town vote to amend the General By-laws of the Town of 
Ipswich "CHAPTER II. ORGANIZATION AND POWERS OF TOWN MEETINGS" " Section 4. 
Quorum ", as presented in Article 38 of the Warrant for the April 4, 1988 Annual 
Town Meeting. Seconded. Finance Committee member Constance Surpitski moved to 
amend Article 38 by striking the number "150" and inserting in lieu thereof the 
number "200". Seconded. The Finance Committee felt that the quorum needed to be 
reduced but that 150 was too low. Kris Muench of the Master Plan Committee said 
that the reason for putting the number at 150 was that it was high enough to pre- 
vent special interest groups from carrying a meeting. There are about 50 people 
who have to attend Town Meeting, another 100 would eliminate any group from 
getting control. Stephen Walsh supported the 150 figure. Mr. Gardner was in 
favor of the amendment; Mr. Engel in favor of the original motion. The vote on 
the amendment carried on a voice vote. The amended motion, setting the quorum at 
200, carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 39 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $5000 to facili- 
tate consolidation of youth services in Ipswich and provide programs that will 
help young people to develop as healthy, productive members of society (said 
appropriation to supplement a grant proposal' to Massachusetts Office of Human 
Resources); or to take any other action relative thereto. (By petition.) 

-31- 



Recreation Director Elizabeth Dorman moved that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $5000 to facilitate consolidation of youth services in 
Ipswich and provide programs that will help young people to develop as healthy, 
productive members of society (said appropriation to supplement the expected pro- 
ceeds from a grant, a proposal for which has been submitted to the Massachusetts 
Office of Human Resources). Seconded. Mrs. Dorman, with three leaders and four 
young people, explained the Leadership Project. Board of Selectmen 4-1 in favor, 
Finance Committee 5-3 against, School Committee supported, League of Women Voters 
supported. Question was moved; the motion carried on a voice vote. 

It was moved, seconded and so voted unanimously to dissolve the 1988 Annual Town 
Meeting at 12:11 a.m. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting up attested copies thereof 
at the Post Office and at each of the meeting houses in the Town, and by publi- 
cation seven days at least prior to the time for holding said meeting, in a 
newspaper published in, or having a general circulation in the Town of Ipswich. 

Given unto our hands this 24th day of March in the year of our Lord, One Thousand 
Nine Hundred and Eighty-eight. 

TOWN OF IPSWICH . 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

William E. George, Chairman 

David S. Player, Jr. 

Robert H. Leet 

James R. Engel 

Thomas A. Elliott 

•****••*** 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

ESSEX, ss 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby directed to notify 

the inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, qualified to vote in Town affairs, to meet 

at the IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL, in said Ipswich on MONDAY, THE TWENTIETH DAY OF JUNE, 

1988, at 7:30 o'clock in the evening, then and there to act on the following 

articles, viz: 

At 7:30 p.m. the Moderator announced that there was not a quorum, and it was voted 
to postpone for 15 minutes. At 7:50 p.m. there were 239 voters present (with 200 
needed for a quorum) and the Moderator called the Meeting to order at 7:55 p.m. 
The Pledge of Allegiance was led by Superintendent of Schools Richard Thompson. 
(Final count was 286. ) 

It was moved, seconded and voted to admit non-voters, including the 4th grade 
class from Winthrop School, to view the proceedings. 

Tellers appointed by the Moderator were: Cathleen McGinley, Frances Richards, 
Lucinda Hackler, John Clogston, Barbara Ostberg and Lillian North. 

-32- 



ARTICLE 1 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause Fifth B, relative to exemptions from taxation of real 
and personal estate belonging to incorporated organizations of veterans; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman Robert Leet moved that the Town vote to accept the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 5(B), relative to exemp- 
tions from taxation of real and personal estate belonging to incorporated organiza- 
tions of veterans. Seconded. This is to rectify an error at the Annual Meeting in 
April, when Clause 5(A) was voted. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recom- 
mended. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 2 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of the twelfth paragraph of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 81U, as added by Chapter 236 of the 
Acts of 1987, enabling the Town to utilize up to $25,000 in subdivision development 
security deposits, without appropriation, to complete a subdivision; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectman William George moved that the Town vote to accept the provisions of the 
twelfth paragraph of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 41, Section 81U, as added 
by Chapter 236 of the Acts of 1987, enabling the Town to utilize up to $25,000 in 
subdivision development security deposits, without appropriation, to complete a 
subdivision. Board of Selectmen recommended, Finance Committee against 7-1. On a 
voice vote, the Moderator declared the motion carried. 

ARTICLE 3 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Official Zoning Map of the Town of 
Ipswich, Massachusetts, to change the district designation of land situate on both 
sides of the street known as Currier Park from the Business District to the Intown 
Residence District; or to take any other action relative thereto. (By petition) 

Selectmen Chairman Thomas Elliott moved that the Town vote to amend the Protective 
Zoning By-law of the Town by amending the present "Zoning Map of the Town of 
Ipswich, Massachusetts" incorporated in Section IV. C, as follows: By discon- 
tinuing a portion of the existing Zoning District boundary line between the "B" 
(Business) District and the "IR" (Intown Residence) District, beginning at a point 
at the existing IR/B boundary line, said point being 300 feet northeasterly from 
the centerline of High Street and on the property line between lots 8 and 11 on 
Assessor's Map 30B; thence following said IR/B boundary line southeasterly across 
said lot 11 and a portion of Currier Park, 130 feet more or less to the centerline 
of Currier Park, across Avery Street and a portion of the Boston and Maine Railroad 
to the centerline of the Boston and Maine Railroad layout and the point of ending; 
and by relocating said IR/B boundary line southerly to the following new location: 
Begining at the aforesaid described point on the existing IR/B boundary line on 
the property line between lots 8 and 11 on the Assessor's Map 30B; thence following 
the property line between lot 8 and lots 11, 10 and 9, and crossing a portion of 
High Street southwesterly, 300 feet to the centerline of High Street; thence 
southeasterly, 560 feet more or less along the centerline of High Street to a point 
of ending on the existing Zoning District boundary line between the "B" (Business) 
Zoning* District and the "RRA" (Rural Residence A) Zoning District opposite Kimball 

-33- 



Avenue; meaning and intending to relocate the following parcels of real property 
from the "B" Zoning District to the "IR" Zoning District as shown on Assessor's Map 
30B, Parcels 9, 10, 11, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 18A, 18B and 19. Seconded. Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended; Planning Board members not present. Carl 
Gardner felt that such a change made sense; though there should be a map available 
to show the change, and asked if the Planning Board had made a recommendation. The 
Town Manager replied that they had held a public hearing and approved. The motion 
carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 4 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to engage 
engineering services to prepare plans and specifications and to procure the 
necessary permits for the reconstruction of portions of Paradise Road and Mitchell 
Road (more commonly known as "Clamshell Road") and for obtaining any materiel and 
services necessary and incidental thereto; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. (By petition) 

Mr. Elliott moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $70,000 to 
engage engineering services to prepare plans and specifications and to procure the 
necessary permits for the reconstruction of portions of Paradise Road and Mitchell 
Road (more commonly known as "Clamshell Road") and for obtaining any materiel and 
services necessary and incidental thereto. Seconded. Board of Selectmen in favor, 
Finance Committee 5 in favor, 1 against, 2 abstentions. A long discussion ensued 
with Paradise Road residents explaining the problems they are having with the large 
trucks and asking for help, Charles Wayne, John Logan, Town Manager and Town 
Counsel speaking on the matter. The question was moved, seconded and so voted. A 
two-thirds vote was necessary; the Moderator declared the motion carried on a two- 
thirds majority voice vote; motion passed. 

ARTICLE 5 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate sums of money to fund supple- 
ments (1) to the Town's FY89 Municipal Operating Budget for Miscellaneous Finance 
(Audit), Health Department Expenses (hazardous materials pickup), Equipment 
Maintenance Capital Outlay, and Wages and Expenses to fund a settlement with Local 
2905, AFSCME; and (2) to fund a supplement to the FY89 Water Division budget for a 
settlement with Local 2905, AFSCME; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town raise and appropriate the following sums 
of monies for the purposes indicated herein as supplements to the FY89 Municipal 
Operating Budget: 

Miscellaneous Finance (Audit) $25,000 

Health Department Expenses (Hazardous 
Material Pickup) 20,000 

Equipment Maintenance Expenses (Fuel 
Tank removal/replacement) 12,000 

Seconded. Finance Committee recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

-34- 



ARTICLE 6 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $10,000 to 
purchase new playground equipment and surface materials for use at Bialek Park; or 
to take any other action relative thereto. (By petition) 

Sue Nelson moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $10,000 to 
purchase new playground equipment and surface materials for Bialek Park. Seconded. 
Mrs. Nelson explained that the playgrounds are in yery poor shape (the equipment); 
her group PARK has gotten support and donations from many Town organizations and 
hope to replace the equipment at all the playgrounds eventually. For the moment, 
they are asking $10,000 from the Town for Bialek Park, which is the largest and 
most widely used. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. 
Question moved, seconded and voted. The motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 7 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to appropriate a sum of money in addition to sums 
raised under Article 15 of the April 06, 1987, Annual Town Meeting and under Article 
19 of the April 04, 1988, Annual Town Meeting to engage engineering services and to 
acquire any related materiel and/or services for the repair of Town owned and main- 
tained bridges; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept and 
expend any Federal and/or State grants which may be available for the aforementioned 
purposes; (3) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or 
other interest(s) as may be necessary to effectuate said repairs, by purchase, gift, 
lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; (4) to determine whether said monies shall be 
raised by taxation, by borrowing, by transfer from available funds, or otherwise; or 
to take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman David Player moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate the sum of 
$98,000 in addition to sums raised under Article 15 of the April 6, 1987 Annual 
Town Meeting and under Article 19 of the April 4, 1988 Annual Town Meeting to 
engage engineering services and to acquire any related material and/or services for 
the repair of Town-owned and maintained bridges; (2) to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to apply for, accept and expend any Federal and/or State grants which may 
be available for the aforementioned purposes; (3) to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or other interest(s) as may be necessary 
to effectuate said repairs, by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or other- 
wise; and (4) that the Treasurer with the approval of the Board of Selectmen be 
authorized to issue $98,000 in notes under the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 6A, in anticipation of State Aid, for the aforementioned 
purposes. Seconded. This is for repairs to Choate Bridge. Board of Selectmen, 
Finance Committee recommended. A two-thirds vote was necessary; the motion carried 
on a unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 8 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell and 
convey for a minimum purchase price to be established by Town Meeting and to execute 
any and all necessary instruments for a portion of the land situate on the north- 
westerly side of Mile Lane (Assessor's Map 29A, Parcel 5); and (2) to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to acquire for care, custody and control by the School Committee, 
a portion of land of Foster Way Realty Trust off High Street (Assessor's Map 30B, 
Parcel 5), and to raise and appropriate a sum of money for said purpose; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. 

School Committeeman Norman Sheppard moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. 
Unanimous voice vote. 

-35- 



ARTICLE 9 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to appropriate a sum of money to acquire a certain 
parcel of land situated near High Street (Assessor's Map 30B; Parcel 5) for the 
purpose of future school use; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
said land by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain or otherwise; (3) to raise this 
appropriation by authorizing the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial notes under the provisions of Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7; (4) to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or 
the School Committee to take any other appropriate action relative to the acquisi- 
tion of this property for the purpose of school use; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. (By petition) 

Angelo Perna moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate the sum of $225,000 to 
acquire a certain parcel of land situated near High Street (Assessor's Map 30B, 
Parcel 5) or a portion thereof, for future school use; (2) to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to acquire said land by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain or 
otherwise; and (3) to raise this appropriation by authorizing the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to issue $225,000 in bonds or serial notes 
under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7(3). 
Seconded. Mr. Perna stated that the land in question (2.4 acres adjoining the High 
School land) is now available for purchase. The school needs land for playing 
fields and may need to expand the building in the future. Cynthia Quinn of the 
School Committee showed a plan of the land in question. The School Committee was 
unanimously in favor. Board of Selectmen 4-1 against; the amount was too much for 
playing fields. The Board felt the matter should be brought up at the next Annual 
Town Meeting. The Finance Committee 3-2 against, feeling the Town was getting too 
close to the tax cap. We are going to have several capital improvements (Middle 
School) coming up soon. Nancy Carter spoke against; Carl Gardner and Bruce Arbour 
spoke in favor. A two-thirds vote was necessary; the motion carried on a hand 
count of 210 in favor, 65 against. 

ARTICLE 10 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to engage 
architectural, legal and appraisal services, and to secure options to purchase one or 
more potential sites for the development of low-income family housing within the 
Town of Ipswich and to procure any materiel and/or services incidental thereto; or 
to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Engel moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $12,000 to 
engage architectural, legal and appraisal services, and to secure options to 
purchase one or more potential sites for the development of low-income family 
housing within the Town of Ipswich and to procure any materiel and/or services 
incidental thereto. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended 
unanimously. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 11 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to appropriate a sum of money to acquire a certain 
parcel of land situated near the Ipswich River commonly called the Carriage House 
(Assessor's Map 42A, Parcel 135A), or a portion thereof, for the purpose of deve- 
loping affordable housing under the Massachusetts Housing Partnership Program and 
to convey said land to the Ipswich Housing Authority; (2) to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire said land by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain or other- 



-36- 



wise; (3) to raise this appropriation by authorizing the Treasurer, with the appro- 
val of the Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds or serial notes under the provisions 
of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7(3); (4) to determine whether 
said appropriation shall be raised by borrowing, transfer from available funds, or 
otherwise; or to take any other action relative thereto. (By petition) 

Mr. Perna moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 12 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 71, Section 40, of 
the General Laws, as amended by Chapter 727 of the Acts of 1987, to raise the mini- 
mum teacher's salary to $20,000; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee member Lawrence Seidler moved that the Town of Ipswich vote to 
accept the provisions of Chapter 71, Section 40, of the General Laws, as amended by 
Chapter 727 of the Acts of 1987, to raise the minimum teacher's salary to $20,000, 
subject to the Town's receiving the Minimum Teacher Salary Grants referred to in 
the Law. Seconded. School Committee 7-0 in favor, Board of Selectmen 3-2 against, 
feeling a situation like this. should be settled by collective bargaining. Finance 
Committee 5-3 in favor. Question moved, seconded, voted. Motion carried on a 
voice vote. 

It was moved, seconded, and voted to dissolve the Special Town Meeting. Meeting 
dissolved at 9:41 p.m. 

And you are directed to serve the Warrant by posting up attested copies thereof at 
the Post Office and at each of the meeting houses in the Town, and by publication 
fourteen days at least prior to the time for holding said meeting in a newspaper 
in or having a general circulation in the Town of Ipswich. 

Given unto our hands this Thirty-First day of May in the year of our Lord, One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and Eighty-Eight. 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Thomas A. Elliott, Chairman 
James R. Engel 
David S. Player, Jr. 
William E. George 
Robert H. Leet 



-37- 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

ESSEX, ss 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby directed to notify 

the inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, qualified to vote in Town affairs, to meet 

at the IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL, in said Ipswich on MONDAY, THE NINETEENTH DAY OF 

SEPTEMBER, 1988, at 7:30 o'clock in the evening, then and there to act on the 

following articles, viz: 

There were 138 present at 7:30 p.m. and the Moderator asked for a short post- 
ponement, which was granted. At 7:50 p.m. with over 300 voters in the hall, the 
Meeting was called to order and the Pledge of Allegiance was led by Superintendent 
of Schools Richard Thompson. The final count was 392. 

It was moved, seconded and voted to allow non-voters in to view the proceedings. 

ARTICLE 1 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money and/or to 
transfer a sum of money from available funds to pay unpaid bills incurred in prior 
years and remaining unpaid; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman Robert Leet moved that the Town vote (1) to raise and appropriate the sum 
of $1,227.32 to pay unpaid bills incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid, viz: 

School Department 



Michael Cahill 


$480.00 


Elizabeth Geanakakis 


61.27 


Ronald Ray 


31.19 




572.46 


Water Department 




Electric Department 


600.00 


Planning Board 




New England Telephone 


29.66 


North Shore Weekl ies 


25.20 




54.86 



Total $1227.32; and (2) to transfer from 
available funds (Water Surplus) the sum of $7200 to pay an unpaid bill of the Water 
Division to L.V.Mawn Corporation incurred in FY88 and remaining unpaid. Seconded. 
Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended unanimously. Motion carried on a 
unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 2 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money and/or to 
transfer a sum of money from available funds to engage professional engineering 
and/or pollution control services to dispose of soils stockpiled in the area of 
Hammatt Street, in accordance with DEQE regulations and policies; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

-38- 



Selectman David Player moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$46,000 to engage professional engineering and pollution control services to 
dispose of soils stockpiled in the area of Hammatt Street, in accordance with DEQE 
regulations and policies. Seconded. Mr. Player explained that the contamination 
had been there for probably 100 years; by agreement the First National Bank will 
pay one-third of the cost, the Town two-thirds. Board of Selectmen, Finance 
Committee unanimously recommended. Carl Gardner stated that the Bank had put the 
pipe in without approval, and moved to amend the motion under Article 2 to $35,000 
instead of $46,000. Seconded. After much discussion, the question was moved, 
seconded, so voted. The motion to amend failed on a voice vote. Seven voters 
stood to protest. The Moderator appointed tellers: Elizabeth Dorman, Charles 
Wayne, Timothy Perkins, Bruce Arbour. On a hand count, the amendment failed 
107-217. The main motion carried on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 3 

To see T7 the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money and/or transfer 
from available funds a sum of money to fund a supplement to the FY89 Sanitation 
Contract departmental budget in the municipal operating budget to cover increased 
costs associated with the special spring and fall pickup weeks; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Selectman William George moved that the Town appropriate the sum of $26,000 to fund 
a supplement to the FY89 Sanitation Contract departmental budget to cover increased 
costs associated with the conduct of the special spring and fall pickup weeks. 
This amount shall not be expended without a determination by Town Counsel that this 
expenditure is legal. Seconded. Board of Selectmen 4-1 in favor; Finance 
Committee 5-3 in favor. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 4 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-law of the Town of 

Ipswich 

1. Amend "SECTION III. DEFINITIONS" by: 

a) deleting the definition of "HAZARDOUS AND TOXIC MATERIALS" in its entirety; 
and by 

b) replacing it with the following definition: "HAZARDOUS MATERIALS - A pro- 
duct or waste or combination of substances which because of quantity, con- 
centration, or physical or chemical, or infectious characteristics may 
reasonably pose, in the determination of the enforcing authority, a substan- 
tial present or potential hazard to the human health, safety, or welfare or 
the environment when improperly treated, stored, transported, used or 
disposed of, or otherwise managed. Any substance which may create a special 
hazard in the event of a spill, leak, fire, or exposure; and any substance 
defined as a hazardous waste pursuant to the provisions of the Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 21C, and pursuant to the provisions of any regulations 
promulgated thereunder, each as amended, if applicable, at the time of 
application or enforcement, shall also be considered a hazardous material 
for the purposes of the By-law."; and 



-39- 



c) adding the following new definition in its appropriate alphabetical 
location: 

"CONTINGENCY PLAN - A document setting an organized, planned and coor- 
dinated course of action to be followed in case of fire, explosion, or 
release of hazardous materials which could threaten public health, safety, 
or welfare, or the environment."; and 

d) adding the following new definition in its appropriate alphabetical 
location: 

"DISCHARGE - The disposal, deposit, injection, dumping, spilling, leaking, 
incineration, or placing of any hazardous material into or on any land or 
water so that such hazardous material or any constituent thereof may enter 
the environment."; and 

e) adding the following new definition in its appropriate alphabetical loca- 
tion: 

"REPORTABLE DISCHARGE - All discharge greater than three (3) gallons in 
liquid volume or five (5) pounds in dry weight, or any discharge which would 
potentially threaten the public health and safety or the environment by 
entering any surface water, groundwater, or water recharge area, or by 
emitting toxic fumes or gases into the air. A discharge which is in 
compliance with all Federal, State, and local regulations, or which is 
permitted by governing Federal, State, or local agencies shall not be con- 
sidered a reportable discharge."; and 

Amend " SECTION V. USE REGULATIONS ", Subsection "D. Table of Use Regulations ", 
by deleting the second paragraph in its entirety, which paragraph presently 
reads: 

"The processing, treating and storing of volatile liquids, hazardous 
wastes, and hazardous chemicals (other than heating fuel, diesel fuel, and 
gasoline) in quantities exceeding two hundred (200) gallons shall not be 
permitted in any district. Hazardous wastes and chemicals shall be 
defined as those listed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Department 
of Environmental Quality Engineering, Division of Hazardous Wastes, issued 
under authority of Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 21C, as amended. 
Treating, processing, and storing of volatile liquids, hazardous wastes 
and hazardous chemicals in quantities of less than two hundred (200) 
gallons (1000 lbs. dry weight) provided that no single container exceeds 
55 gallons, shall be permitted in any district. Except for retail 
establishments storing inventory of five gallons or less, uses shall be 
allowed only by special permit issued by the Zoning Board of Appeals. As 
a condition of special permit, all uses shall be monitored by an inventory 
system accounting for all incoming and outgoing materials."; and 

and in lieu thereof by adding to " SECTION V. USE REGULATIONS" , Subsection "D. 
Table of Use Regulations" , a second paragraph which reads as follows: 

" APPLICABLE TO ALL DISTRICTS - HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS 

PROHIBITED: the processing, treating and storing of hazardous materials 
(other than heating fuel, diesel fuel and gasoline) in quantities 
exceeding two hundred (200) gallons liquid volume or one hundred (100) 
pounds dry weight shall not be permitted in any district. 

-40- 



BY SPECIAL PERMIT : The processing, treating and storing of hazardous 
materials (other than heating fuel, diesel fuel and gasoline) in quan- 
tities less than two hundred (200) gallons in liquid volume or one hundred 
(100) pounds in dry weight shall be permitted by Special Permit by the Zoning 
Board of Appeals unless the primary use is subject to Special Permit appro- 
val by the Planning Board, in which case the Planning Board shall have 
the Special Permit granting authority. 

In reviewing the Special Permit application, the permit granting authority 
shall consider the following information: 

(1) the quantity of hazardous materials to be stored; 

(2) the types of materials to be stored; 

(3) the storage facilities and precautionary measures proposed 
for the materials; 

(4) the contingency plan for the facility; 

(5) the Town's present capabilities to handle any fire, accident, 
or other emergency situation relative to the materials stored; 

(6) employee training program to ensure proper handling, treating, use, 
and storage of hazardous materials; 

(7) monitoring program for overseeing the loss of hazardous materials 
on-site; and 

(8) specific environmental and/or site specific concerns. 

The permit granting authority reserves the right to hire a registered pro- 
fessional engineer and/or chemist experienced in the analysis, handling, 
treating and/or storing of hazardous materials. Costs for consultant ser- 
vices shall be borne by the owner/applicant. 

REGISTRATION : Every owner or operator of a commercial or industrial 
establishment (including municipal, state, and federal operations) which 
stores, transports, uses, handles, or otherwise manages hazardous 
materials (excluding fuel oil stored for the purpose of heating buildings 
located on site) totaling more than two hundred (200) gallons in liquid 
volume or one (100) pounds in dry weight shall register with the Building 
Inspector. Such registration shall include the following: 

a. Submission of a map or written description locating areas where 
hazardous materials are stored, handled, used, and specifying the approximate 
average quantities of materials in each location and any special handling 
required in the event of a fire, leak, spill, or exposure. Areas shall be 
identified where emergency equipment, including medical supplies, are 
stored, together with a brief description of the capabilities of said 
equipment. This map or written description shall be posted in one of the 
following on-site locations: 1) guard shack; 2) fire alarm box; 3) 
sprinkler riser; or 4) another location acceptable to the Head of the Fire 
Department. The location of this posting shall be specified during 
registration. 

b. Submission of the name, address, and telephone number of each 
qualified "Emergency Coordinator" who is an individual identified by the 
owner or operator of each commerical or industrial establishment which is 
required to register in accordance with this by-law. An Emergency 
Coordinator shall be knowledgeable in the types of hazardous materials 
used at the establishment and their proper storage and handling, shall be 
familiar with the establishment's emergency contingency plan, and shall be 
authorized as an on-site coordinator in the event of an emergency. 

-41- 



c. The requirement that the registrant maintain on file at all 
times in an on-site location known and accessible to each Emergency 
Coordinator, Material Safety Data Sheets on all hazardous materials 
manufactured, stored, or used at the establishment. These Material 
Safety Data Sheets shall be available to the Building Inspector, Board of 
Health and Head of the Fire Department during routine inspections and 
investigations and in the event of an emergency. 

d. The requirement that the registrant maintain on file at all 
times in Emergency Coordinators and details the areas where and the manner 
in which each type of emergency could arise, the techniques and procedures 
to be used for prevention and control of any such emergency, the emergency 
equipment available on-site, outside agencies and organizations which 
should be notified and/or which may provide services in an emergency, an 
evacuation plan for personnel, and an inventory of the types, approximate 
quantities and methods of storage, transportation, and disposal of all 
hazardous materials. 

EFFECTIVE DATE OF REGISTRATION: 



a. Registration required shall be initially submitted to the 
Buidling Inspector by January 1, 1989, and annually thereafter within 
thirty (30) days of January 1 each year. Records required shall be kept 
on file at each establishment and shall be updated as frequently as 
necessary to ensure proper handling of hazardous materials and adequate 
procedures to minimize emergencies and the damage which would result from 
such emergencies. 

b. Owners and operators of commercial and industrial establish- 
ments who have not previously registered in accordance with the require- 
ments noted above shall, if they meet registration requirements, register 
initially by January 1, 1989, and thereafter within thirty (30) days of 
January 1st of each year. 

UPDATING OF REGISTRATION INFORMATION : All information required under the 
REGISTRATION REQUIREMENTS shall be maintained to reflect any substantial 
change in quantities or types of hazardous materials on-site from those 
data contained in any prior registration. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS : Each hazardous material within the Town of Ipswich 
shall be stored, handled, transported, and used in such a way as to mini- 
mize discharge and to ensure maximum protection of the environment and the 
public health, safety and welfare. 

Each owner/applicant of a commerical or industrial establishment 
(including municipal, state and federal operations) shall comply with all 
Federal, State and Municipal Laws, Rules and Regulations relative to 
hazardous materials. 



-42- 



ENFORCEMENT : Any discharge of hazardous material within the Town of 
Ipswich shall be prohibited. Any person having knowledge of a discharge of 
hazardous material shall immediately report said discharge to the Building 
Inspector and to the Head of the Fire Department. 

The Building Inspector and/or his designee and the Head of the Fire 
Department shall have the right to enter upon privately-owned property for 
the purpose of performing inspections and other duties under this by-law. 

FEES: 



Any person registering the storage of hazardous materials pursuant to this by- 
law shall pay to the Town an annual Registration Fee of one hundred 
dollars ($100.00) plus five cents ($.05) for every gallon or fraction 
thereof of storage capacity up to the two hundred (200) gallon limit; and 
one hundred dollars ($100.00) plus five cents ($.05) for every pound in dry 
weight up to the limit of one hundred (100) pounds. Such fee shall be due 
on the same date as the annual registration. Failure to pay shall consti- 
tute a violation of this by-law. Pursuant to properly adopted regula- 
tions, the Building Inspector may charge for expenses incurred in the 
enforcement of this by-law."; or take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen Chairman Thomas Elliott moved that this article be indefinitely postponed. 
Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 5 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the following subsection of the Protective 
Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich: (1) SECTION V.D. " Table of Use Regulations ", 
by deleting the second paragraph of said Section V.D. in its entirety, and by 
substituting therefore the following new, second paragraph: 

"The processing, treating, and/or storing of volatile liquids, hazardous 
wastes, hazardous chemicals and/or all Class A, Class B or Class C substances 
(other than heating fuel, diesel fuel, and gasoline), in quantities exceeding 
two hundred (200) gallons or one thousand (1000) pounds dry weight shall not be 
permitted in any district. 

Hazardous wastes and hazardous chemicals are defined as all of the substances 
included within the definition of "Hazardous Waste" contained in M.G.L. c21C #2 
and/or the "Massachusetts Oil and Hazardous Materials List" contained in 310 
CMR 40.900 et seq ., each as amended, if applicable, at the time of application or 
enforcement. Volatile liquids are defined as all of the substances (other than 
heating fuel, diesel fuel, and gasoline) covered by 527 C.M.R. 14.02 and 14.03 
and M.G.L. c.248 #9 and #13, each as amended, if applicable at the time of 
application or enforcement. 

Processing, treating, and/or storing of volatile liquids, hazardous wastes, 
hazardous chemicals and/or all Class A, Class B or Class C substances (other 
than heating fuel, diesel fuel, and gasoline), in quantities less than two 
hundred (200) gallons or one thousand (1000) pounds in dry weight, provided no 
container exceeds fifty-five (55) gallons, shall be permitted in any 
district."; and 

-43- 



(2) SECTION III. DEFINITIONS by deleting the existing paragraph entitled 
"HAZARDOUS AND TOXIC MATERIALS" and by substituting in lieu thereof the 
following paragraph: 

Hazardous wastes and hazardous chemicals are defined as all of the substan- 
ces included within the definition of "Hazardous Waste" contained in M.G.L. 
c21C #2 and/or the "Massachusetts Oil and Hazardous Materials List" con- 
tained in 310 CMR 40.900 et seq ., each as amended, if applicable, at the time 
of application or enforcement. Volatile liquids are defined as all of the 
substances (other than heating fuel, diesel fuel, and gasoline) covered by 
527 C.M.R. 14.02 and 14.03 and M.G.L. c.248 #9 and #13, each as amended, if 
applicable at the time of application or enforcement."; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. (By petition) 

Charles Wayne moved that the Protective Zoning By-law of the Town of Ipswich be 
amended. Seconded. Mr. Wayne gave the background of the hazardous waste by-law and 
the present need for tightening it up. Board of Selectmen 3-2 in favor; Finance 
Committee and Planning Board unanimously in favor. In answer to a question, agri- 
cultural chemicals are excluded from local control. Motion carried on a unanimous 
voice vote. 

ARTICLE 6 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to raise and appropriate a sum of money to acquire 
certain parcels of land in the area of Town Farm Road and Locust Street 
(approximately shown as Assessor's Map 30B, Parcels 37A, 37 and 33) or portions 
thereof, for the purpose of developing low income family housing, and to obtain any 
and all services incidental thereto; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire said land by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise, and once 
it is so acquired, to convey the Town's interest(s), or a portion or portions 
thereof, to the Ipswich Housing Authority; and (3) to determine whether said 
appropriation shall be raised by taxes, transferred from available funds or raised 
by borrowing under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7(3); or to take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. George moved that action on this Article be indefinitely postponed. Seconded. 
Negotiations have broken down because of the unreasonable asking price by the owner 
and the upset to residents. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously in 
favor. Harry Howarth felt the Spencer land proposal was poorly prepared; the land 
has an Indian burial ground and open space. He first learned of it when he bumped 
into the Town Manager and a group on his driveway last Thursday. Mr. Elliott stated 
that it was the Town's obligation to provide low-income housing and all sections of 
the Town will be considered. Mr. Howe said that it was not easy finding land. The 
Town must supply land for twenty units of affordable housing, or the 0ECD might 
refuse the grant to convert Cable Hospital into housing units. The Reverend Bruce 
Arbour, concerned about the talk he had been hearing around town, said that these 
(low-income) people are not going to infect our neighborhoods; we are going after 
affordable housing not for the sake of grant money but to help people. The issuing 
of a comprehensive permit to a developer under the anti-snob zoining was discussed; 
Catherine Lefebvre, an attorney, explained the anti-snob zoning regulation. Paul 
McGinley said that a comprehensive permit has checks and balances. Ipswich has 
always been welcoming to all kinds of people. On two recent occasions, proposals 
have been i 11 -prepared. We should tell the Housing Authority, the Board of 
Selectmen, and the Town Manager to get together and work to solve the problem, to 
develop a good proposal that we can vote on at the next meeting. Go back to 0ECD 

-44- 



and ask for an extension, tell them we are working on it and really want to do it. 
Sara O'Connor, Housing Authority Chairman, said the Authority had been working dili- 
gently with the Town Manager; housing is much-needed; the first seventeen units 
would go to Ipswich residents. The question was moved, seconded, voted. The motion 
carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 7 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to appropriate a sum of money to extend and enlarge 
its electric lighting plant and to procure any legal, engineering, architectural and 
other services necessary and incidental thereto; and (2) to raise this appropriation 
by authorizing the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen to issue 
bonds and/or serial notes under the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 8(8); or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Engel moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate the sum of $1,500,000 to 
extend and enlarge its electric lighting plant and to procure any legal, engi- 
neering, architectural and other services necessary and incidental thereto; and (2) 
to raise this appropriation by authorizing the Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Board of Selectmen, to issue bonds and/or serial notes under the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 8(8). Seconded. Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended unanimously. The motion carried on a una- 
nimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 8 



To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money, and/or 
transfer from available funds a sum of money to fund supplements to the FY89 munici- 
pal operating budget and the FY89 Water Division operating budget to fund the provi- 
sions of a contract settlement with Local 2905, AFSCME; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Mr. Player moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $75,000 to 
fund supplements to the FY89 Municipal Operating Budget and the FY89 Water Division 
operating budget to fund the provisions of a contract settlement with Local 2905, 
AFSCME. Seconded. This is a three-year contract. Board of Selectmen, Finance 
Committee recommended unanimously. The motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

It was moved, seconded and voted unanimously to dissolve the Special Town Meeting at 
9:32 p.m. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting up attested copies thereof at 
the Post Office and at each of the meeting houses in the Town and by publication 
fourteen days at least prior to the time for holding said meeting in a newspaper 
published in or having a general circulation in the Town of Ipswich. 

Given unto our hands this 30th day of August in the year of our Lord, One Thousand 
Nine Hundred and Eighty-eight. 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Thomas A. Elliott, Chairman 
David S. Player, Jr. 
James R. Engel 
Robert H. Leet 
William E. George 

-45- 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Thomas A. Elliott, Chairman 

The election in April saw the return of Bill George to the Board. Bill's 
thoughtfulness and dedication is certainly an asset to the community, and we 
thank him for his continued service. 

The Citizen Queries section of our agenda has been active again this year. We 
have made an effort to deal with these issues in an efficient and expeditious 
manner, and would encourage the community to continue bringing issues of concern 
to the Board's attention. 

The successful bringing on-line of the new Water Filtration Plant was certainly 
the highlight of the year. The long-awaited good quality drinking water in 
Ipswich is here, and complaints about water have been reduced to near zero. We 
thank everyone for their efforts and cooperation in bringing this project to its 
successful conclusion. 

Other areas in which the Board has taken an active leadership role this year 
have been: 

A. The changing of the zoning bylaw as it pertains to storage 
of Class A-B-C materials, such as motor oil. 

B. The changing of the zoning bylaw as it pertains to the Currier 
Park area, to protect the already-established homes in the area. 

C. The working toward a solution for truck traffic on Paradise Road, 
with an engineering study underway. 

The Board has tried to deal with the many road and storm drainage problems that, 
in some cases, have been around for awhile. Although we have sometimes been 
frustrated in our efforts, two that have been completed successfully have been 
the drainage improvements on Avery Street and the resurfacing of Scottons Lane. 

In conclusion, the Board this year has moved more toward long range planning and 
will continue to do so; but as we plan for the future, your input is the criti- 
cal ingredient that will drive us toward the year 2000. We encourage your input 
and ideas; but, more important, your active participation in solving the 
problems and molding the future of Ipswich. 

Finally, after serving nine years on the Board, David Player is not seeking re- 
election. We would like to thank him for his service. 

****** 

TOWN MANAGER 
George E. Howe 

Nineteen eighty-eight well could be characterized as a year in which some pro- 
jects were completed successfully, while others experienced unfortunate delays. 

On the bright side, the Town's new water filtration facility commenced commer- 
cial operations on July 13th. Construction costs proved well within budget. A 
pleasant dedication ceremony occurred on September 24th. 

-46- 



Projects which experienced significant delays during the year included repairs 
to Choate Bridge, pending several additional detailed historical clearances; 
drainage repairs and improvements in the areas of Argil la Road and Lakeman's 
Lane, pending the outcome of newly rekindled interest in such projects by the 
Army Corps of Engineers; and Linebrook Road reconstruction. 

Ultimately, Linebrook Road was reclaimed within the existing layer. Other 
public works projects which were successfully completed include a coordinated 
resurfacing of one-half of the downtown parking lot; draining, surfacing, and 
landscaping of the Topsfield Road commuter lot; and the reasonably cost- 
effective disposal of a large pile of contaminated soils drawn from a drainage 
trench in the Municipal Lot. 

Housing issues commanded considerable time in 1988. In exchange for state sup- 
port for a Housing Development Action Grant to help fix up the closed Cable 
Hospital Building, the Town agreed to secure a site for twenty units of low 
income family housing. The Town was unsuccessful in securing a site at its Town 
Meetings in April, June and September and asked the Housing Authority for 
assistance. 

Continued improvements were made in the computerization of our finance admi- 
nistration. A revaluation was completed on a timely basis; and we achieved 
peaceful resolution of collective bargaining with all units, including a new 
Electric Department Group Four Retirement bargaining unit. 

In public safety, a major effort was undertaken to study fire department 
emergency operations, facilities, equipment, staffing, training and overall 
management toward the end of making major improvements. New departmental regu- 
lations were adopted, a squad truck was purchased to help at brush fires. Also, 
the Town hired its first two full-time female firefighters. 

In closing, I wish to thank the Selectmen, Finance Committee, and the Town Staff 
for their continued support during the past year. 

****** 

ASSESSOR'S OFFICE 

Frank J. Ragonese, Chief Assessor 

The total valuation January 1, 1988, was $989,008,890. 

The valuation of the Town by class is: 

Class 1 Residential $868,645,900 87.83% 

2 Open Space — 

3 Commercial 68,103,960 6.87 

4 Industrial 42,024,200 4.25 

Personal Property 10,234,830 1.05 

The tax rate for Fiscal Year 1989 was $7 .95/thousand. The revaluation conducted 
by M.M.C., Inc. was completed by November 1988 with all real estate tax bills 
reflecting new values mailed November 21, 1988. 

-47- 



****** 

BUILDING DEPARTMENT 
Joseph Ferruzzi 

The following report represents a 15% increase in permitting activity over 1987 
levels and a 75% increase in fee collection. 

Dwelling 
New Buildings (NB) New Units (DU 

Single Fami ly 
Two Fami ly 
Multiple Fami ly 
Commercial /Industrial 
Accessory Buildings 



Total 



Alterations/Additions (ALT) 



Single Fami ly 
Two Family 
Multiple Family 
Commercial /Industrial 
GRAND TOTALS NB 91 ALT 

Miscellaneous (MISC) 



59 


59 


1 


4 


8 


79 


9 


- 


13 


- 


91 


142 




Dwelling 


New 


Units (DU) 


123 




3 


- 


6 


25 


23 


- 


155 


DU 167 



Roofing, siding, pools, sheds, wood stoves, 

fences, replacement windows, repairs, decks, 

signs, retaining walls, etc. Total 341 

Demolition (DEMO) 



(R) (C/I) 
Full I 

Partial 15 

Misc. Structure 16 



Total 32 



Violations (VIO) 



Zoning Bylaw (ZBL) 33 

Building Code (BC) 8 

Unsafe Building (UB) 3 

Demo Delay Historical (DDH) 2 

Total 
GRAND TOTAL - PERMITS 

Building Permits 
Plumbing Permits 
Gas Permits 
Occupancy Permits 
Certificates of Inspection 

GRAND TOTAL 

Fees Collected $100,325.00 

Value of Construction $30,910,969.00 



-48- 



46 






Number 


Fees 




623 


$96,915. 


,00 


162 


5,930, 


.00 


160 


6,117, 


.00 


125 


1,250, 


.00 


53 


2,160, 


.00 



****** 

CEMETERY, PARKS AND BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT 
James E. Graff urn, Superintendent 

General grounds work was performed in all of the Town's nine cemeteries, 
parks and playgrounds. 

New fencing and repairs were made to the baseball backstop at Bialek Field. 
Thirty-six yards of infield material was spread at the ball fields at Bialek 
Park. 

The existing avenues at Linebrook Cemetery were graded and hot topped using 104 
tons of asphalt. 

The department has continued to clear an area in the Highland Cemetery for 
future use. 

There were five four-grave and seven two-grave lots awarded to veterans. 
Two eight-grave, seven four-grave, eighteen two-grave, and five single 
graves were sold, all with perpetual care. 

Also, there were sixteen Government markers set; fourteen corner post sets 
installed; seventy-one monument foundations poured and eight markers set. 

Chapel Tent $1,450.00 
Sale of Lots 3,175.00 
Perpetual Care 5,000.00 
Foundations 3,092.50 

Interment Openings 15,357.00 

$28,074.50 

****** 

CIVIL DEFENSE 

David R. Clements, Director 

John T. Clogston, Assistant Director 

The year of 1988 was again a busy year for Civil Defense. The Emergency 
Operating Center (E0C) continues to stay open on Monday evenings from 7:00 p.m. 
to 9:30 p.m. to assist the public with questions concerning Civil Defense. 

All units of Ipswich Civil Defense continued to meet on a monthly basis for 
further training and instructions in their related fields. 

The Auxiliary Police continue to train with the regular Police Department on 
weekend patrols and to assist the department in times of emergency, as seen by 
Acting Chief Surpitski. This department is a great credit to not only myself 
but to the Town of Ipswich. 

This year the staff, along with Fire Chief Emerson, has completed the planning 
and workshops for S-A-R-A Title III (Superfund Amendments & Reauthorization Acts 
of 1986). This plan is mandated by Public Law 99-499, Executive Order 276. 
This law requires that this town's Local Emergency Response Plan (L.E.R.P.) be 
prepared to deal with hazardous materials, and in dealing with accidents and 

-49- 



evacuations. This plan is now complete and on file with the State Civil Defense 
Office. I would like to thank Chief Emerson for his time and expertise in 
completing this plan. 

This year I received a letter of retirement from David Savage, our Chief Radio 
Officer. David "Doc" Savage has been with Civil Defense for thirty years, many 
of those years as our Chief Radio Officer. As Chief Radio Officer, the radio 
department has been well established. His devotion and expertise will be 
greatly missed. It is volunteers like Doc who make Civil Defense what it is 
today. To you, Doc Savage, the Town of Ipswich and Civil Defense thanks you for 
your contribution to Civil Defense. 

This department is still active in the North Shore Civil Defense Council and 
has on file a Mutual Aid Plan which is used to help and assist each other in 
times of emergencies. 

Along with our monthly meetings and our E.O.C. operations, Civil Defense is 
always looking for volunteers to make this an even more productive department 
for the Town of Ipswich. 



•****• 



COMMUTER RAIL COMMITTEE 
William Varrell, Chairman 

Commuter Rail continues to be \/ery popular as evidenced by inadequate space 
in the Commuter Parking Lot. 

The major Commuter Rail event of the past year was the paving and landscaping of 
the commuter parking lot that was completed during June and July. Closing the 
lot during construction caused much less inconvenience than originally antici- 
pated; but the fact that landscaping and designating travel lanes and specific 
spaces resulted in space for approximately 25% fewer cards initially caused con- 
siderable inconvenience for those who had to watch trains pull out as they fran- 
tically searched for a parking space. Unfortuntately, we will not have a 
long-term solution to this problem for several more years when the line is 
rebuilt to Newburyport, and stations are built at Newburport and Rowley. 
However, inadequate space seems to be less of a problem now that people know 
what to expect and have perhaps adjusted their schedules, walk to or get dropped 
off at the station, or have found acceptable alternative parking near the sta- 
tion. 

As for appearance and our local image, the parking lot changes are a decided 
improvement; and the resulting live parking area for people being dropped off or 
picked up works very well. 

The Commuter Rail Committee was instrumental in having an adequate street light 
placed at the Topsfield Road entrance to the parking lot. At train time, the 
combination of cars entering and leaving both the Commuter and Sylvania parking 
lots, plus people walking across Topsfield Road, created a busy and potentially 
dangerous intersection. The addition of a high intensity light directly over 
this intersection is a decided improvement to public safety. 

During the year, the increasing need for public transportation has resulted in a 
significant shortage of railroad coaches, often meaning that people had to 

-50- 



stand, or ride in dilapidated old cars that were a cross between a refrigerator 
and an oven. During the summer, the situation became intolerable; but with the 
help of the press, State Representatives, and Rail Activists in other com- 
munities along our rail line, the situation improved. We now almost always have 
enough seating, but reasonable cleanliness is often a problem. Until more new 
equipment is delivered later this year, there will no doubt continue to be 
problems with poor temperature control, broken or missing lights, and broken 
seats. 

Late in 1988, the MBTA conducted hearings and announced a significant fare 
increase, the first in seven years, to take effect in April 1989. Everyone 
would like to see this fare increase translated to improved service, but with the 
State's current budget problems, the fare increase is required in order to main- 
tain the schedule available today. 

The Commuter Rail Committee has no profound responsibilities but will continue 
to act as a liason and catalyst between the MBTA and Ipswich rail commuters to 
insure that we receive the best service possible. Please feel free to make us 
aware of your questions and problems relating to local commuter rail service. 

****** 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
Lillian V. North, Chairman 

The Ipswich Conservation Commission is a seven-member official Town board 
charged with the authority of upholding the regulations of the Wetlands 
Protection Act, Chapter 131, Section 40 of the Massachusetts General Laws. 
Under the provisions of the Act, no person may remove, fill, dredge or alter 
certain resource areas without first filing a Notice of Intent and obtaining an 
Order of Conditions. 

The Commission meets bi-weekly and conducts an average of six to twelve on-site 
inspections per month, plus the monitoring of on-going projects, on foot and by 
aerial surveillance. 

The following is a list of 1988 activity compared with 1987 and 1986. 

1986 1987 1988 

Notice of Intent 
Orders of Conditions 
Enforcement Orders 
Determinations of Applicability 
Certificates of Compliance 

In 1988, preliminary attempts to retain a part-time Conservation Agent we^e 
begun, primarily to assist the Commission in handling applicants, to monitor 
ongoing projects more closely, etc. Preliminary discussions were undertaken 
regarding Clamshell Road and better relations with the Essex County Mosquito 
Control were established. The Commission acquired a 1.9 acre parcel of salt 
marsh and purchase details of another 25.9 acre parcel of uplands were firmed 
up. Interaction between the Commission and other town boards and departments 
conti nued. 

Site inspections in 1988 became a bit more bearable with hearty, pre-inspection 
breakfasts. The usual heat, cold, mosquitoes, greenheads and ticks prevailed. 

-51- 



24 


41 


30 


21 


36 


29 


4 


9 


6 





2 


7 


4 


3 


6 



****** 

DOG AND ANIMAL CONTROL 
Harry W. Leno, Jr. 

The Ipswich Humane Group this year has planned an overall expansion and better- 
ment of the Ipswich Pound. This includes numerous cemented outdoor runs for 
incarcerated dogs. Also planned is a new isolation area along with a new office 
area. This insures the consistent upgrading and modernization of the Ipswich 
Pound. 

During 1988, there were: 



Complaints received 


3,020 


Complaints investigated 


2,918 


Dog bites 


16 


Animals ki lied by cars 


143 


Animals ki lied by dogs 


6 


Dogs picked up 


218 


Dogs and cats euthanised 


3 


Dogs returned to owners 


188 


Cat complaints 


419 


Citations issued 


144 


Patrol hours 


1,312 


Licenses issued 


1,156 


Dogs and cats adopted 


65 


****** 





FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Edwin R. Emerson, Chief 

Influence and support by the Task Force for the Fire Department budget and 
operating efficiency have been strongly felt throughout the year. With the help 
of the Task Force, the Department was able to purchase a four-wheel drive pickup 
truck. The new truck is used for inspections, brush fires, and medical aid. 

With the support of volunteer labor from the permanent and call firefighters, a 
smoke and drill tower located behind the Electric Light Department building is 
98 percent completed. This tower will be used for training with ladders, 
rescue, and breathing apparatus. 

Two new permanent firefighters graduated from Massachusetts Firefighting 
Academy. Three new firefighters (who will attend the Academy in 1989) were 
appointed to the Department to replace two retirees and to add one position to 
bring the total number of permanent firefighters up to 16, or 4 to a shift. 

An extremely successful Open House was held during October's Fire Prevention 
Week thanks to the efforts of Lt. Durrell. The citizens turned out in great 
numbers. 

The Department made the following inspections: 41 for occupancies, 146 for oil 
burners, and 243 for smoke detectors. The department responded to 115 Bell 
alarms and 530 Still alarms. There were incidents as follows: 29 Structural, 
16 Motor Vehicles, 64 Brush, 123 Rescue, 45 Hazardous Conditions, 115 Service, 
54 Good Intent, 122 False, and 77 Other. Linebrook Station responded to 100 
runs in 1988. 

Permits brought in $5,590. 

-52- 



*•**•* 

HALL-HASKELL HOUSE COMMITTEE 
Vivian Endicott, Chairman 

Early in 1988, the Preservation Agreement was signed enabling the Massachusetts 
Historical Commission, the Town, and the Committee to prepare for the work of 
restoring the Hall -Haskell House. 

It had been a long and laborious task for all - especially Terri Stephens who 
shouldered the work of Coordinator between the Historical Commission, the Town, 
and the contractors. It was her attention to detail, her patience and perser- 
verance that carried the project through. 

By the time all the details of the project were approved and contractors found, 
winter was upon us. Work began in earnest in January and continued until June 15th, 
the scheduled date for completion. 

In August, the Little Red House received its distinguishing coat of paint which 
has protected it from wintry winds and inclement weather. 

Our Committee gives thanks to all friends who volunteered their help, to Elsa 
Fitzgerald and her crew at the Massachusetts Historical Commission, to George Howe, 
Betsy Ware, Selectmen and Finance Committee for their support. 

*•*•*• 

HARBORMASTER 

Charles Surpitski, Harbormaster 

David Brouillette, Deputy Harbormaster 

We issued 508 mooring permits up 2% over last year resulting in the collection 
of $14,088 in fees for a 5.8% increase. 

A total of 122 calls were answered for a 96.7% increase with the breakdown 
as follows: 

Responded to 47 emergency calls - up 42% 
Answered 15 calls for enforcement - up 650% 
Investigated 8 reported thefts - up 166%, which 

resulted in the loss of $13,495 in property 

of which $10,000 was recovered 
The remaining 52 calls were general in nature - 

up 116% 
Issued 32 citations for various violations. 

Also in 1988, we added an additional 12 channel markers in the Eagle Hill River 
to assist boaters navigating this narrow channel from the landing to Green's 
Point; installed a portable Jiffy John at the Town Landing for the convenience 
of the public; and replanked 22 feet of docking and restacked the large boulders 
used as ice breaking protection on the right side of the ramp which had fallen 
over rendering that side of the catwalk unusable. 

-53- 



****•• 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Domenic A. Badolato, Jr., Health Agent 

The following is the yearly report of the activities of the Health Department 
under Domenic A. Badolato, Jr., for the year 1988. 

LICENSES AND PERMITS ISSUED: 



Food Service 


66 


Retail Food 


12 


Disposal Works Construction Permits 


86 


Septic Haulers 


8 


Septic Installers 


40 


Swimming Pools 


2 


Recreational Camps 


2 


HEALTH INSPECTIONS AND INVESTIGATIONS: 





Food Service Inspections 273 

Full Housing Inspections 202 

No Heat Complaints 3 

Trash & Debris Complaints 73 

Insect & Rodent Complaints 7 

Perc Tests 228 

Septic Plans Reviewed 157 

Septic System Inspections 92 

Referrals from Building Inspector 28 

Referrals from Fire Department 4 

Referrals from Police Department 15 

Swimming Pool Inspections 16 

Water Testing 28 

Dye Testing 73 

Conferences Attended 12 

Health Complaints (Miscellaneous 59 
Investigated) 

FEES COLLECTED FOR VARIOUS SERVICES : 

Food Permits (Retail Food, Catering, Ice 

Cream, Bakeries, Mobile Food Service) $3857.00 

Individual Subsurface Sewage Disposal 
Systems (Perc Tests, Plan Approval, 

Septic Installers, Septic Haulers) $9179.00 

Recreational Camps $ 40.00 

Swimming Pools $ 20.00 

Miscellaneous (keeping of pigs, ice 

machines, temporary catering) $ 210.00 

TOTAL $13,306.00 



-54- 



Sealer of Weights & Measurers - Norman J. Bedard, Sealer 

The office of the Sealer of Weights and Measures performed numerous functions as 
required by the National Bureau of Standards, directed by the U.S. Chamber of 
Commerce, Washington D.C.; the General Laws of Massachusetts as related to 
Weights and Measures; the rules and regulations of the State Division of 
Standards, now called "The Division of Consumer Affairs"; and the Town of 
Ipswich, Massachusetts, ordinances. The testing and sealing of oil truck meters 
from the Town of Ipswich was performed in Beverly, Massachusetts, at the Public 
Works garage operated by Mr. Ralph O'Brien, the Beverly Sealer. Our gratitude 
to Mr. O'Brien who graciously loaned and helped with all necessary equipment. 

Scales and balances, tested, adjusted and sealed 73 

Avoirdupois, apothecary and metric weights tested and sealed 99 

Scales and balances adjusted and sealed 8 

Scales and balances not sealed 1 

Scales and balances condemned 

Gasoline pump meters tested and sealed 56 

Gasoline pump meters adjusted before sealing 3 

Gasoline pump meters tested and not sealed 3 

Oil truck meters tested and sealed (vehicle tank meters) 8 

Oil truck meters (vehicle tanks) tested and adjusted before sealing... 1 

Warnings issued to oil truck drivers for broken seals in transit 3 

Leather measuring machines tested and sealed 1 

Number of breads reweighed and checked for correct weight & prices ... 25 

Number of breads reweighed and found incorrect 4 

Meats reweighed for correct weight and price 24 

Meats reweighed and found incorrect in price and weight 4 

Turkeys and poultry reweighed for correct weight and price 24 

Turkeys and poultry reweighed and repriced for correction 4 

Drug stores balances tested and sealed 3 

The personal weighers (scales) at all public schools in the Town of Ipswich were 
tested and sealed (at no cost) in the year 1988. 

Receipts of Department of Weights and Measures : 

Sealing fees received and paid to Town Treasurer for 1988 $1,081.00 

Expenditure of Department : 

Salary of The Sealer for the year 1988 2,800.04 

****** 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
Mary P. Conley, Chairman 

The year 1988 saw the continuation of work on several preservation projt -ts by 
the Ipswich Historical Commission. 

The first, in May, was the presentation to the Town of the Civil War 
Kurz-Allison prints which had been carefully restored by the staff of "Another 
Atmosphere" in Newburyport. At a joint meeting, sponsored by the Commission and 
the Ipswich Historical Society, the prints were exhibited at the Doyon School to 
the townspeople in a program that emphasized the influence and meaning of the 
Civil War in the history of Ipswich. The restored prints were later hung in the 
offices of various departments at Town Hall where they may be seen. 

~55r- 



In July, thanks to a generous transfer of funding by the Master Plan Commission, 
our Commission was able to hire historical consultant, Gretchen Schuler, to 
assist us in developing a Preservation Plan that would outline the goals and the 
programs of the Commission for the next few years. The consultant, after 
studying the Town's historical resources, has suggested that the most effective 
preservation tool available is the legislation for an Historic District - G.L. 
Chapter 40C. The Commission is studying the implications and significance of 
this measure as well as the effectiveness of possible alternatives, such as the 
Neighborhood Conservation District, as we attempt to lay out our future efforts 
in the field of preservation. 

Throughout the year, the Commission has participated with other Town depart- 
ments in the historical and engineering studies planning for the repair of 
Choate Bridge. As part of the effort, the Commission and the Historical Society 
jointly sponsored a conference at the Heard House in November to focus not only 
on the historical significance of Choate Bridge but also on its strategic loca- 
tion on Routes 1A and 133. We welcomed an evolving consensus about the bridge 
repair which suggests that only a most painstaking restoration will renew its 
strength to enable it to handle the increasing traffic of the coming years. 

The Demolition Delay By-Law has been in effect since mid-1987. The Commission 
believes that it is working more effectively than anticipated, thanks in good 
measure to the cooperation of the Building Department. Moreover, there seems to 
be a growing awareness among the citizens that they should not pull down a 
porch or tear down an ell of a one hundred year old building without talking 
with the Commission because we just might be able to help them save a piece of 
our history. 

*•**•* 

IPSWICH ARTS LOTTERY COUNCIL 
Nancy C. Warner, Chairman 

The Ipswich Arts Lottery Council is the local arm of the Massachusetts Arts 
Lottery Council. Our responsibility is the selection of local projects for Arts 
Lottery grants and support for the purchase of tickets to cultural events for 
school children under the Performing Arts Student Series program. Final review 
is made at the State level. Our funds are held in the Town Treasury for distri- 
bution to the grantees when their projects are completed. 

This year the Council held its second Art Show and Competition. Sixty-six 
Ipswich artists submitted work which was professionally judged and monetary 
awards were given. The show was held at the First Church in Ipswich and was 
enjoyed by hundreds of Ipswich residents. 

Pri ze wi nners were: 

Irina Okula (First) 

Biruta McDonald, Gay P. Cox (Second) 

Chip Dort, Paul Soffron, Dan Sullivan (Third) 

Grantees for the 1988 calendar year were: 
Biruta McDonald 

Folk Dancing at the Winthrop and Doyon Schools 
League of Women Voters - Ipswich River Appreciation Day 
John Moore 
Susan Boice 
Susan Vicenti 

-56- 



Funding for Arts Lottery grants comes from proceeds of the Massachusetts 
Lottery. Local deadlines for applications are April 1 and October 1 for the 
July and January granting periods. Applications are available at the 
Town Clerk's Office. 



****** 



LIBRARY 

Eleanor M. Gaunt, Librarian 

Great strides were taken in 1988 toward full automation of the library's book 
charging and record-keeping systems. Staff and volunteers completed the enor- 
mous job of entering book titles into the Merrimack Valley Library Consortium 
data base. In October, new plastic bar coded library cards became available for 
issue to borrowers. 

The Board of Library Trustees continued to seek solutions to the space, accessi- 
bility, and air-conditioning needs of the Library, spurred on by the availability 
of $35 million in State Funds for library addition and renovation projects. 
Following authorization by Town Meeting to apply for funds, our architects were 
called in to complete design development plans for a 4,000 square foot addition, 
including handicapped accessibility and climate control. A grant application to 
cover 75% of the cost was completed by year's end. Realistically, we do not 
expect to receive the full amount requested. 

Over 36,000 visits were paid to the library during 1988 by people who borrowed 
82,328 books and magazines; 1,877 cassettes, 1,596 records, and 90 videocasset- 
tes from the library's growing collections, or 7.46 items per capita. We 
borrowed from other libraries 7 films and 328 books for Ipswich residents, and 
loaned 102 books to other libraries. The library's total book collection, 
children's and adult, stands at 58,800 items; 1,540 recordings, 416 cassettes 
(music and spoken), and 48 videocassettes. The video collection was established 
by a gift of 12 travel videos from the Friends of the Library, and continues to 
grow in response to suggestions. 

A most significant contribution by the Friends was the purchase of passes to six 
Boston and area museums. The "Friends" group continues to lend invaluable sup- 
port to many library programs and services. We salute and thank, too, our 
steadfast volunteers who contribute many, many service hours to the library. 

We have responded to numerous requests received through the Library's suggestion 
box for purchases of books and magazines, along with improved lighting in the 
stack area. An asbestos removal project was completed during the summer months; 
and the Rogers Room received a new coat of paint along with repairs to damaged 
plaster. 

A newly established Chess Club for all ages meets in the Children's Library 
e^/ery other Saturday. A highly successful mother/child coffee hour was held to 
discuss programs and new books for children. Other special programs included a 
summer theater program, a folk singer, and a multi -media presentation on dino- 
saurs. The annual checker tournament and poetry contest were held, along with 
special seasonal programs, films, and the First Annual Halloween Story Week, 
with the Friends. Three story hour sessions were held October-June, with 
approximately 50 children enrolled. Two summer reading programs were held, with 

-57- 



approximately 200 in attendance, and summer story times attracted 15 children. 
Visits from nursery school and kindergarten groups were welcomed throughout the 
school year. 

Children's Librarian Ruth McCullough retired in June after five and one-half 
years of service; and former Assistant Marilyn Pauley was appointed to her post 
in July. 

The Board of Library Trustees honored Phyllis Bruce for her twenty-five years of 
service as a library trustee. She was named Trustee Emerita by her fellow 
Board members. 

Remember, the Trustees and Staff are always looking for ways to improve service, 
and welcome new ideas. Please stop by the Library sometime with your 
suggestions. 

****** 

MASTER PLAN COMMISSION 
Douglas E. Denninger, Chairman 

In the first three months of 1988, the Master Plan Commissionn (MPC) focused on 
warrant articles for the Annual Town Meeting. As the initial step in corridor 
protection, scenic road designations were requested for Mill Road and portions 
of Linebrook Road and Topsfield Road. Corridor protection is the preservation 
of natural and historic resources along the major roads into town. 

At town meeting, the scenic roads warrant article received strong voter support. 
A major revision to the parking requirements of the Zoning Bylaw was defeated, 
while a provision relating to storage trailers was accepted. 

During the remainder of 1988, the MPC concentrated on four areas. The zoning 
subcommittee, assisted by Connery Associates, proceeded with corridor protection 
and proposed an office park district for Route 1. The infrastructure subcommit- 
tee worked with Tufts students on a buildout study of four major areas of 
Ipswich. The historical subcommitee worked with the Historical Commission and 
consultant Gretchen Schuler to study historic preservation techniques 
appropriate for Ipswich. The open space subcommittee, with the assistance of 
others including Rolf Diamant, completed and published a study entitled "A 
Strategy for Conservation of the Ipswich River" which made recommendations such 
as dramatically expanding the existing river walk. Work was also begun on land 
acquisition/disposition procedures for the town and a review of the wetlands 
bylaw. 

Special thanks to Betsy Ware/Town Planner, and Jean Dauer/M.^C Secretary. 

****** 

PLANNING BOARD 

William E. Bingham, Chairman 

In the past year, the Planning Board has continued its efforts to review land 
development proposals and guide planning activities. The Board will continue to 
work closely with other Town boards and commissions to ensure the comprehensive 
review of proposed developments and to create growth and development policies in 
the Town of Ipswich. 

-58- 



The Board reviewed a number of proposals for subdivision, special permits and 
site plan review within the past year. Two of the larger subdivisions approved 
by the Board - Jewett Hill, a 34-lot subdivision, and the Doyon 15-1 ot sub- 
division, required a great deal of review by the Board and their consultants. 
Smaller subdivision proposals brought to and approved by the Board included: 
two lots on outer Linebrook Road (Bishop), two lots on Linebrook Road 
(Purlington), one lot on Chattanooga Road (DiCarlo), etc. Several small sub- 
divisions proposals submitted for Mill Road, Gravelly Brook Road, Foster Way and 
the Linebrook Road were denied due to incomplete plan submissions and/or 
inappropriate development proposals. 

A number of special permits were granted by the Board in 1988. The majority of 
these permits were for developments within the Water Supply B District on 
Mitchell Road and High Street. The Board will continue to impose conditions on 
special permits within this district in an effort to protect the Town's water 
supply, in general, and Brown's well, specifically. Other special permits were 
granted for a development under the Open Space Preservation Zoning (33 units 
within Meadowview Farm on Essedx Road) and for a multi -family development at 88 
High Street. On several occasions, the Board has had difficulty balancing the 
historical character of a building with the developer's request for a multi- 
family development. As a result, the Board has and will continue to seek the 
guidance of the Historical Commission so that older buildings may be restored 
and the historic character of an area will not be compromised. 

A number of site plan review proposals were also reviewed in 1988. Since its 
adoption in Spring 1987, the Board has reviewed approximately a dozen proposals 
for commercial and industrial additions or new structures. The Board reviewed 
and approved proposals for Route One (Markos and Filtrani), Mitchell Road 
(Tinker Realty Trust and Dover Realty Trust), and Depot Square (LeVie). 

As a result of a busy 1988, the Board saw several membership changes this year. 
With three Board meetings per month, members are required to commit long hours 
while serving on the Board. In December 1987, after serving for a number of 
years, John Logan resigned from the Board. Kenneth Savoie, a registered archi- 
tect, was appointed to serve the remainder of the term. In August 1988, Erpest 
Jerrett resigned from the Board to devote more time to his contracting business. 
Attorney Catherine Lefebvre was appointed to serve the remainder of his term. 
Both new members offer new expertise to the Board and will complement the skills 
of existing board and staff members. 



***•*• 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Charles D. Surpitski, Acting Chief 

Over the past year, the Police Department underwent major changes in t. ?. area of 
personnel. In April Sgt. Frank Geist retired, and September marked the retire- 
ment of Chief Armand R. Brouillette. To fill these voids, Sgt. Charles 
Surpitski was appointed as Acting Chief, and Ptls. Arthur Solomonides and Guy 
Saulnier were appointed as Acting Sergeants. Hopefully all supervisory 
positions will be filled permanently during 1989. 

The Police Department is staffed by 23 full time police officers and one civi- 
lian clerk. One patrolman's position remained vacant throughout the year, and 
there were periods when extended sick leave and leaves of absences further dimi- 
nished the number of personnel. Despite these shortages, the Department 

-59- 



remained responsive to the needs of the community and answered 7,389 public i ni 
tiated calls for services, issued 1,010 civil motor vehicle infractions, pro- 
cessed 386 warrants and summonses and handled 748 criminal court complaints. 

Training to meet the changing needs and expectations of society and police 
response to them continues to be stressed. The foundation of the police 
mission of attracting and keeping quality personnel, coupled with good training 
and public involvement and support will be expanded. 

A statistical breakdown of the categories of types of incidents handled follows: 



Breaking & Entering 


56 


Attempted Breaks 


11 


Larcenies 


210 


Attempted Larcenies 


11 


Stolen Motor Vehicles 


9 


Recovered Motor Vehicles 


15 


Domestic Complaints 


93 


Missing Persons 


38 


Found Articles 


82 


Lost Articles 


50 


Sudden Deaths 


25 


Robbery 


1 


Malicious Damage 


203 


Threats & Assaults 


185 


Protective Custody 


59 


Accidents 


424 


Accident Injuries 


76 


Accident Fatalities 


1 


****** 





PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 
Armand T. Michaud, Director 

The Public Works Department coordinates the activities of the following divi- 
sions: Public Works Administration, Highway, Forestry, Equipment Maintenance, 
Town Hall and Municipal Garage Building Maintenance, and Snow and Ice Control. 
Each division is charged with particular responsibilities relating to its 
duties. When additional manpower is required to perform specific tasks, person- 
nel are interchanged with the divisions. 

Below is a summary of the work completed by each of the Public Works Divisions: 

Snow and Ice Control 

The Public Works Divisions combine their work forces during the winter months. 
Work consists of plowing roads, hauling snow, sanding, salting roadways, filling 
sand barrels, cleaning catch basins, clearing snow away from hydrants, and 
answering miscellaneous complaints. Other personnel assisting the Public Works 
crews during the height of the snow storms were from the Cemetery and Water 
Departments. Also utilized were the services of twelve private contractors. 

Equipment Maintenance Division - Robert Hetnar, Diesel Mechanic 

All Public Works vehicles are serviced and repaired at the Municipal Garage. At 

present there are 32 pieces of motorized equipment that must be kept in good 

-60- 



operating condition to insure its availability when needed. Operation cost 
records showing maintenance and gas/oil expenses on each vehicle can be ascer- 
tained from the Public Works Administration Office in the Town Hall. 

Building Maintenance Division - Joseph Reilly, Custodian 
Routine maintenance and minor repairs were performed at the Town Hall and 
Municipal Garage throughout the year. New heating pipes were installed in 
the Town Hall . 

Highway Division - Norman Stone, Foreman 

The Highway Division, which is the largest in the Public Works Department, is 
charged with the maintenance and repairing of the Town's streets and drainage 
systems. The winter schedule consists mainly of Snow and Ice Control and 
routine maintenance which does not require excavations. During the other three 
seasons, the men are kept busy with projects varying from road construction to 
street sweeping. 

Normal maintenance consists of patching streets, repairing the Town's drains and 
repairing sidewalks. Curbing and sidewalks were put in on Broadway Avenue. 

All catchbasins in Town were cleaned. Several plugged drains were cleared. New 
storm drains were put in on Valley Drive, Linebrook Road, and Avery Street. 
Cross over drains were put in on Linebrook Road. 

The following roads were hot topped: Old Essex Road, South Main Street, Mill 
Road, and Linebrook Road. 

The following roads were stone sealed: One half of Old Right Road, East Street 
#2, Greens Point Road, Labor-in-Vain Road, and Pineswamp Road. 

Street sweeping was performed twice a week in the downtown area from April to 
December. All Town roads and sidewalks were swept in the spring to rid them of 
winter sand deposits. 

Crosswalks, parking spaces, and traffic lines were painted in the downtown 
areas. As in previous years, the crosswalks were painted green. Also 142,239 
linear feet of center lines and fog lines were painted. 

All gravel roads were graded twice in 1988. 

The Highway Division purchased one new truck and one new street sweeper in 1988. 

Other projects included rebuilding the parking lot at the Railroad Station, new 
cross walk light on Central Street, and hot topping the parking lot in back of 
the First National Bank (Town's share). 

Chapter 90 

Linebrook Road was rebuilt and resurfaced. 

Forestry Division - Robert Comeau, Foreman 

The mitigation of the Dutch Elm Disease has again been one of the principal con- 
cerns of the Forestry Division. Approximately 172 Elm trees with beetle 
infestation were removed as well as Maples, Oaks, Lindens, and Pines. 

Each first grade student was given an Ash tree to take, plant, and care for in 
observance of Arbor Day. About 317 trees were donated. 

-61- 



The Forestry Division planted approximately 102 various types of trees around 
Town. Also, they planted several trees on High Street and Argil la Road for 
local Garden Clubs. 

Round-up was sprayed along several miles of roadside to control brush and weeds. 
Amate was used to control the spread of poison ivy. 

Other work performed by the Forestry Division consisted of trimming and pruning 
trees, removing limbs, cutting brush (major projects were along Kimball Brook, 
as well as along several roads), roadside mowing, setting up voting booths for 
election, and setting up for the Annual Town Meeting. 

••***• 

RECREATION AND YOUTH DEPARTMENT 
Elizabeth M. Dorman, Director 

Programs and activities continued for various age groups. For children there 
were summer playground programs, swim and tennis lessons, Halloween Parade and 
Program, Xmas program, vacation week activities, summer track, sand sculpture 
and several trips (roller skating, Canobie Lake, Beverly Luau, pizza party/magic 
show, movie trip, Music Theatre). The Hershey track competition had three local 
youngsters qualify for the State Meet, two win their events there and one go to 
the National Finals in Hershey, PA. Activities for teens included ski trips, a 
Red Sox game, roller skating, Xmas shopping, a dance, and trips to Canobie Lake, 
Water Country and "Scream in the Dark". Trips and events were also organized 
twice a month during the school year for special needs youngsters in our local 
Saturday Recreation Program. 



Volleyball and basketball programs 
lessons, Community Band, and trips 
tions in Boston. Family events inc 
Marathon, a block dance, Community 
events such as the Memorial Day Par 
Field Day. Senior citizen activiti 
Burlington Mall, Science Museum and 
Cathedral of the Pines, Fall River 
as well as transportation to severa 
Topsfield Fair. The "Seniors on th 
featured at a Golden Agers' meeting 



continued for adults as well as tennis 
to the Boston Pops and First Night celebra- 
1 uded a tree-lighting program, the annual 
Band Concert, and a Red Sox game, and civic 
ade and the July 4th Children's Parade and 
es included trips to the Flower Show, 

Omni Show, Lafayette Place, Freeport, Maine, 
Outlet Shopping and the Pheasant Lane Mall, 
1 nearby concerts, "nights out", and the 
e Go" variety show from Sharon, MA, was again 



Office activities included the issuing of over 300 permits for ballfields, and 
for tennis and basketball court use in spring, summer, and early fall. 
Registrations were handled for over 600 swim slots and numerous trips for dif- 
ferent age groups as wel 1 as the Marathon. Utilization of a department computer 
improved recording procedures and generation of forms, lists, and reports as 
well as data bases for swim students and trip participants. 

A local chapter of the National Youth Sports Coaching Association was 
established in Ipswich to provide training for volunteer coaches. Several local 
coaches were certified in baseball, Softball, or soccer after attending sessions 
taught by the Recreation Director. 

Cooperation with the School Department allowed a sharing of fields and facili- 
ties; and alliances were continued with veterans' groups, senior citizens, youth 
and adults sports leagues, adult education, Scout and Campfire groups, the YMCA 



-62- 



and the Chamber of Commerce. Many town groups used the Memorial Building for 
meetings, registration sessions, and classes such as dog obedience and ballroom 
dancing. Coordination with PARK, a parent's group interested in improved equip- 
ment at Town playgrounds, led to fund-raising for new units at Bialek and a 
master plan to upgrade the smaller play areas. 

Lifeguard coverage at Pavilion Beach was increased to include weekdays, and 
overlapping shifts on the weekends provided two people on duty during the busiest 
hours. The swim program moved to the Asbury Grove pool site in Hamilton, and 
students were bused for two sessions a day as usual. 

The Recreation Commission comprised of seven members of the community and the 
Recreation Director met regularly throughout the year to discuss programs, 
plans, facilities, and policies. Members of the Commission helped in the super- 
vision of some programs such as the Marathon, summer track, and youth special 
events; and they continued to explore the concept of a new building at Bialek 
Park and a possible adjacent outdoor pool as part of a master plan to coincide 
with the proposed new play equipment. 



■kkkkkic 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Jeffrey A. Simon, Chairman 

The year 1988 was a significant growth year for the Ipswich Schools. The 
completion of the Winthrop School addition during the previous year meant that 
not only could all of the Town's students be accommodated in educationally sound 
facilities, but that the focus of efforts could return to the basic concerns of 
curriculum development and instructional excellence. Activity in each school 
reflected the renewed vigor with which the schools are responding to this 
expressed community desire. 

Several areas stand out for particular mention. The Computer Subcommittee led 
the way in having the schools use the latest in learning technology by orga- 
nizing a full -day computer workshop for the entire teaching staff. Impressive 
presentations were made by teachers currently integrating the use of computers 
as learning tools at all academic levels. The future in this area is wery 
exciting, not only in the ability of educational computer integration to provide 
information, but most importantly in the ability of computer-aided learning to 
provide yet another way of responding to the different learning styles of stu- 
dents. Having each student reach his or her maximum learning potential is the 
goal of all of our efforts. 

The focus on curriculum was bolstered by the compilation of a Curriculum Guide 
for all grades, Kindergarten through Grade 12. This is a \/ery unusual document 
for a school district to have, and a first draft for Ipswich. It will provide 
the starting point for assessment and redefinition of many areas of study. The 
guide was produced by the teaching staff with a coordinator in each subject 
area. Subject area curricula are still coming in and will be reviewed and 
refined for placement into the Guide. 

The citizens of the Town expressed their strong support for their schools, not 
only in the much appreciated vote on the budget, but in voting overwhelmingly to 
have the schools acquire a parcel of land next to the High School to be used 

-63- 



for athletic facilities and future expansion of school facilities. It is our 
hope that fruitful negotiations with the owners will produce an agreement where 
the property will be used for the benefit of the entire Town. 

The past year saw the reelection of veteran members Margot Sherwood and Larry 
Seidler, and of member Carl Soderland, who had been appointed to the School 
Committee the previous year. Interest by parents and other Town's people also 
grew this year, with several instances of having more volunteers for subcommit- 
tees than we could place. Strong schools not only need the kind of strong 
leadership evidenced by the reelection of the school committee members, but need 
the continued participation of parents at all levels. 

There was one major administrative staff change in 1988, this change being the 
departure of Winthrop School Principal Alan Lewis and the appointment by the 
School Committee of Rebecca van der Bogert as Interim Principal. Ms. van der Bogert 
has been a significant and talented addition to the Ipswich administrative team 
of Ken Cooper, Ron Landman, Steve Fortado, and Betty Geanakakis. She has a par- 
ticular interest in Higher Level Thinking Skills as has been a national speaker 
on the topic. Superintendent of Schools Dick Thompson should be particularly 
commended for his ability to put this kind of talented team together. 

The School Committee is extremely appreciative of the continued and growing sup- 
port that the community has shown for the schools. We have heard the Town's 
strong concern for a focus on effective teaching and a quality curriculum, and 
we will continue to respond. We look forward to the coming year with great 
expectations for the future and ability of eyery child, and reaffirm our commit- 
ment to these ambitions. 



**•**• 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
Richard F. Thompson 

It was a year for big changes in the Ipswich Public Schools, with steady progress 
in almost all important educational areas as follows: 

1. We are looking ahead to the graduating class of the year 2000 and making 
sure our Ipswich students will be properly prepared for that world of 
advanced technology that will face them. Our joint committee of parents, 
teachers, and administrators are deciding staffing needs to implement our 
curriculum development. 

2. Educational research tells us that schools are better and students learn 
more when teachers are involved in the decision making of the schools. We 
have actively worked to involve teachers this past year in Ipswich, and they 
are reporting that they do feel more pleased and prouder to be teaching in 
our schools. This should make us all feel proud. 

3. The Winthrop School addition was completed in December 1987 and occupied in 
January 1988, providing a library, an art room, and several classrooms. 

4. Our teachers' contract was settled without problems for September 1988 
through August 1991. 

5. Several leadership changes occurred. Alan Lewis left the principalship of 
Winthrop School, and we hired Becky van der Bogert who has completed all of 

-64- 



her doctoral course work at Harvard. She brings new information and dire- 
tion to this school. Ken Cooper, who replaced Bill Waitt as principal of 
the Doyon School, has his doctoral degree from the University of Colorado 
and brings vision to our schools while maintaining the stability which we 
know is important for good education. Barry Hopping replaced Arthur Carey 
and has introduced some new sports to our schools. 

Hence, I can report with great pride that the Ipswich Schools are continuing to 
progress in quality, leadership ability, and planning for the future. In this 
time when many school systems are struggling to maintain, we should especially 
celebrate our progress and continued success here in Ipswich. 

•*•*•* 

DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL SERVICES 
Elizabeth J. Geanakakis, Director 

Department goals addressed and accomplished during the 1987-88 school year 
were as follows: 

1. To identify key indicators in measuring the effectiveness of a 
Public School Special Education Program. 

2. To analyze time management of the School Adjustment Counselor, 
Educational Diagnostician, and School Psychologist. 

3. To improve The Team Meeting process, both legally and in group 
interaction. 

4. To update and revise the Department of Special Services Manual. 

5. To significantly increase faculty participation in both decision 
making and responsibility for the results of decisions. Focus 
to be on responsibility. 

The goals are in addition to regular Department responsibilities. 

During the 1987-88 school year, the following took place: 

Number of: 

New Referrals for Team Evaluations 82 
Team Evaluations that resulted in new or 

continued placement 136 

Team Evaluation that resulted in NO placement 12 

Team Re-evaluation of Individual Student Programs 66 

Annual Review of Individual Student Programs 128 

Screening of: 

3 year olds 24 

4 year olds 26 
Kindergarten 117 



TOTAL 167 

Total number of Special Needs Students serviced in 1987-88: 286 

Number of Special Needs Students completing program goals: 19 

Number of Special Needs Students graduating: 9 

-65- 



The Department received the following entitlement grants for which we must 

apply each year: 

Title VI B 94-142 $71,020.00 

Title I 89-313 9,800.00 

Early Childhood 10,000.00 

A Chapter 188 Early Childhood competitive planning grant written by Margaret 
Madeiros was funded for $9,965.00. 

An on-site graduate level Nutrition Education Course was funded through a grant 
of $3,500; written by Douglas Woodworth Health/Teacher/Coordinator. 

The High School Special Education program increased staffing with a full-time 
special needs teacher being transferred from Middle School to the High School. 
This allowed for increased mainstreaming, "Special Education Student being 
taught in regular classes with SPED and regular teachers co-teaching". 

The Special Education staff maintained a high level of diagnostic, developmen- 
tal, emotional and instructional support, working closely with regular class 
teachers and administration. 

*•••** 

WINTHR0P SCHOOL 

M. Rebecca van der Bogert, Interim Principal 

The calendar year 1988 has been one of challenge. It has enabled us all to find 
out who we are, what capacities we have, and how we can best work together to 
meet the needs of the students of Ipswich. The opening of the new wing of the 
school brought an increase in the student population from 341 to 405 and an 
increase in staff from 50 to 69. In addition, August brought new leadership to 
the school when Becky van der Bogert was appointed Interim Principal. 

These changes provided both parents and staff the opportunity to take on 
leadership roles in the process of turning the transitional period into a time 
for growth and renewal. The level of professionalism and commitment of the 9 
staff and parents has been apparent in the projects that have taken place this 
calendar year. 

The parent organization, The Friends of Winthrop, has accomplished a great deal 
in their role. The have sponsored an Ice Cream Social, a Fall Social Gathering, 
and monthly meetings. These meetings have offered presentations on special 
programs in the school, and the organization of projects such as a Logo Contest 
which will bring us a new logo on T-shirts in the Srping aid the Winthrop Jog-a- 
thon. They have alos formed active Sub-Committees such as the Nutrition 
Sub-Committee, Great Books, and the Special Program Committee which has brought 
us Dinosaur Rock, The Life of Louis Braille, and Tribal Rhythms. 

Two additional groups have contributed to the running of the school. The School 
Improvement Council comprised of parent, teacher, and community representation 
has been overseeing the spending of state monies for the purpose of improving 
the school. A Parent Forum has also been set up that meets monthly for the pur- 
pose of hearing and acting on parent concerns. 

Teachers have consistently taken on leadership roles in the school throughout 
the year. Each grade level has sponsored a Curriculum Evening that provided 

-66- 



parents with comprehensive information about their child's school year. 
Individual teachers have also been involved in curriculum innovation such as the 
writing of the Language Arts and Reading Curriculum, and school -wide projects 
such as the People Encouraging People Campaign, and the Presidential Election 
project. Staff members have also been instrumental in bringing Bill Halloran, a 
world famous speaker, to the school to help us in the area of reading. 

The positive results that we received on the most recent statewide testing have 
confirmed our sense of pride that we all feel about the efforts the Winthrop 
Community has made this year on behalf of the children of our town. 

****** 

PAUL F. DOYON MEMORIAL SCHOOL 
Kenneth B. Cooper, Ph.D., Principal 

The 1987-1988 school year at the Doyon Elementary school was a year of stability 
in terms of personnel and enrollment, and growth in the strength, scope, and 
vitality of our programs and operations. 

Mrs. Marie Mirandi joined the faculty in the Doyon Resource Room after many 
years at the Landmark School; Mrs. Mirandi holds a B.S. Degree in Special 
Education from Fitchburg State College. There were no other changes in the 
Doyon faculty. 

Enrollment has stabilized at about the 390 level - this is almost exactly what 
it was a year ago. 

Movement in the main subject areas saw Doyon faculty involved in the writing of 
new curricula in research skills, writing, and reading. The primary grades con- 
tinued to refine their use of "whole language" instructional techniques while 
all grades are incorporating more literature in the reading program. We con- 
tinue to believe that process writing (and keyboarding skills) are crucial if 
our students are to learn how to express themselves. We regarded with great 
interest the recent recommendations of the National Council of Teachers of 
Mathematics and are incorporating more problem solving in math. 

We were most pleased that in the past year, Eric Jalbert, a Doyon student, was 
one of two pupils in Massachusetts to win a National Young Writers award; Doyon 
Grade 5 pupils received the 16th highest score in the nation in the Social 
Studies Olympiad; all Doyon students passed all sections of the State Basic 
Skills Test (given at the Grade 3 level); the schoolwide median Total battery 
1988 California Achievement Test score was above the 75th national percentile; 
Anne Amnott, a Grade 5 teacher, won a Danforth Fellowship and wrote a cirriculum 
regarding the Heard House and the China Trade; Gretchen May, Guidance Counselor, 
was selecteed by NESDEC to present a series of workshops around the State on 
Enhancing Teacher Responses ; and Judy Ferrara (Resource Room) and Mary B^aquiere 
(Physical Education) both had articles published. 

Other special programs over the past year included a week of activities to com- 
bat bullying in the school (coordinated with the Winthrop School), a Playwright 
in Residence program (funded by the Friends), and an after-school activities 
program made possible through the School Improvement Council. 

-67- 



The Friends of Doyon continued to be an important positive force in the life of 
the school. Thanks to the Friends, we have a parent representative network pro 
viding support for every classroom, an emergency phone chain, and a series of 
enrichment Assembly programs. The Friends also helped with the landscaping of 
the courtyard, the Pumpkin Patch exhibition, and of course annual Doyonathon 
fundraiser. Their good cheer and support help to make us feel that what we are 
trying to do is a true team effort. 

As a school we continue to work towards providing a top quality educational 
program for your children, while also caring for them as people. It continues 
to be an honor and a pleasure for us to work on behalf of a community that has 
been so supportive and that cares so much. 



****** 



IPSWICH MIDDLE SCHOOL 
Ronald Landman, Principal 

During the 1987-1988 school year, the Ipswich Middle School provided services 
for 311 students - 114 sixth graders, 87 seventh graders, and 108 eighth gra- 
ders. In servicing these students, the administration and faculty made a com- 
mitment to raising the self-esteem of students. Due to numerous contemporary 
issues, e.g., family pressures and peer influence, many children do not accept 
their worth or their being different as being human. Presentations of the 
"golden sneaker," compliments, and discussion groups comprised the methodology 
for effecting this. Another goal was to teach youngsters to accept their dif- 
ferences. If they can treat themselves with a good sense of humor, the stud- 
ents relieve the accumulating pressure of trying to be "perfect." 

In connection with this was the necessity of discussing values. This year the 
emphasis was to be honest and to admit mistakes with acceptance of consequences. 
Too many media examples confirmed the fact that "getting away with something" 
was better than being honest. Cafeteria discussion and rewards continued to 
attempt to confirm "honesty is the best policy." The rationale for this was that 
being educated is not sufficient, being an "educated person" was the ultimate 
goal. 

In the area of academics, the higher level thinking skills and individualized 
instruction continued to be addressed. For example, literature was now the pri- 
mary vehicle for enhancing writing and reading skills. Interdisciplinary units 
also were involved in all three teams. Accelerated math programs were now in 
place in the sixth grade and will continue through each grade. These were small 
steps in resolving these issues, but their implementation was a constant growth 
in improving educational quality. 



****** 



IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL 

Stephen M. Fortado, Principal 



I am pleased to submit my fourth annual report to the citizens of Ipswich. 

The 1987-1988 school year began on September 7 with 424 students. One hundred 
and one freshmen replaced the 127 seniors who graduated on June 5, continuing the 
trend of declining enrollments that should reach its lowest point in the 

-68- 



1989-1990 school year. Thereafter, we should experience a gradual increase in 
enrollments as larger classes move through the school system. Enrollment pro- 
jections indicate that by the year 2000 we should be approaching the 480 mark 
again. Lower enrollment figures have presented us with the challenge to con- 
tinue providing the wide variety of courses and co-curricular opportunities for 
our students. Through the efforts of our guidance counselors, department heads 
and faculty, along with the help of computer scheduling software, we continue to 
meet that challenge. 

In 1983, the National Commission on Excellence published the famous report, "A 
Nation at Risk," criticizing the nation's high schools for having disjointed 
curriculums. The commission recommended that high schools require courses 
called the "new basics:" four years of English, three years of foreign 
language, three years of mathematics, three years of social studies, three years 
of science, and one-half year of computer science. In 1983, only twenty-one 
percent of Ipswich High School graduates met the "new basics" criteria. I am 
happy to report that in 1988 ninety-six percent of our graduates met that cri- 
teria. 

Seventy-three percent of our 1988 graduates are continuing their education, with 
fifty-eight percent attending four-year colleges, eleven percent attending two- 
year colleges and four percent going to other educational institutions. 

I wish to express my sincere appreciation to the parents of our students and to 
the citizens of Ipswich for their continued support of our efforts to provide 
quality education for the students of Ipswich High School. 

****** 

SHELLFISH DEPARTMENT 

Philip A. Kent, Shellfish Constable 

Thomas F. Dorman, Chairman, Shellfish Advisory Board 

Water pollution and its associated problems was determined to be the principle 
problem affecting shellfish beds on our coastal northshore by representatives of 
coastal communities from Newburyport to Manchester that met earlier this year. 
Failing septic systems, storm drain infiltration, and boating discharges have 
been considered as the main sources that force closures of many shellfish beds 
that have previously been utilized by commercial and recreational shel If ishermen 
for decades. During the summer, even swimming at Crane's Beach was off limits 
for a weeks time because of high fecal coliform counts in the coastal waters. 
The Shellfish Advisory Board and the Constable have expended many hours and days 
to the problem, and it appears to be the type of situation that will require 
constant attention and cooperation with other town boards and officials. 

Doctor Stuart Jacobson has been working with Constable Kent in an ongoing pro- 
ject to enhance clam spat collection through the use of wire mesh enclosed 
cages. So far, this work has shown that our flats are exposed to seeding but 
other factors are preventing the seed clams from reaching maturation. 
Predators, especially the green crab, are voracious eaters of young clams and 
mussels. Knowing this, Mr. Kent has again been using his 45 traps to selectively 
reduce the crab populations in areas where seed beds have developed. This type 
of work appears to be successful; however, more time and resources will need to 
be allocated to this effort. 

-69- 



Hydraulic cultivation, the washing of the top 2-3" of soil on an unproductive 
area will be a major project this spring. A pump has been purchased, and two 
cultivators have been constructed by the Constable. Silt and small predators 
inhabit the surface of many of our flats, and we believe the reduction of these 
will result in the overall improvement of our areas. 

Overall, commercial and recreational clamming levels are the same as last year. 
There were 32 persons involved with commercial shellfishing during the year and 
over 250 residents and families participated in recreational fishing for sea 
clams, soft-shelled clams, blue mussels, and other species. We are \/ery for- 
tunate to have these waters that provide for so many of our residents. 

•*••** 

TOWN CLERK 

Isobel N. Coulombe 

1988 Population: 12,310 

Comparative Vital Statistics recorded in the past four years: 

1985 1986 1987 1988 



Births 


143 


136 


139 


121 


Deaths 


102 


131 


128 


112 


Marriages 


88 


107 


104 


90 



There were 61 females and 60 males born to Ipswich residents in 1988. Of the 
total number of deaths recorded (63 females, 49 males), 101 were residents; the 
oldest resident was 99 years old, the youngest was 5 hours old. Of the 90 
marriages recorded in Ipswich, 32 took place elsewhere; in 18 marriages, one 
party was a non-resident, and in 14 marriages, both parties were non-residents. 

DOG LICENSES 1986 1987 1988 



Males 


657 


661 


596 


Females 


53 


60 


57 


Spayed Females 


597 


581 


498 


Kennels 


25 


26 


22 



1332 1328 1173 
The 1988 Census found 1419 dogs in Ipswich. 

SHELLFISH LICENSES & PERMITS 1987 1988 

Resident Yearly 

Resident Family 

Resident Commercial 

"Over 60" Resident Recreational 

Non-resident Yearly 

Non-resident Daily 

Non-resident Commercial 

Non-res. Comm'l Rack Tickets 

399~ 32F 
TOWN ELECTIONS: 

The Annual Meeting for the Election of Town Officers was held in accordance with 
The Warrant on Monday, April 11, 1988, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. The ballot box in 
Precinct 1 registered 82 ballots cast; in Precinct 2, 72; in Precinct 3, 45; in 
Precinct 4, 59, for a total of 258 votes cast in the four precincts, out of a 
total of 7556 registered voters. This was the smallest election held in Ipswich 
in recent memory. 

-70- 



134 


128 


74 


84 


33 


32 


14 


14 


58 


52 


22 


16 


4 





60 






****** 

TOWN COUNSEL 
Charles C. Dalton 

The year 1988 was a year of increased and continual activity on the legal front 
for the Town and its personnel. 

The Building Inspector, detecting many violations of the Aquifer Protection 
Overlay District Zoning By-Law, instituted several enforcement actions in the 
Essex County Superior Court, attempting to effect compliance of several lan- 
downers with the Special Permit requirements of the Aquifer Protection District 
and other violations of the Zoning By-Law. Most of these cases appear to be on 
the way to a successful resolution and eventual full compliance with the Special 
Permit requirements of the Zoning By-Law. 

The Board of Appeals and the Planning Board were the subject of a number of 
appeals to the Essex Superior Court and the Land Court by disappointed lan- 
downers and abuttors. 

In addition to a steady volume of litigation, the Town made substantial efforts 
to acquire various parcels of real estate, including a 25 acre parcel on the 
Ipswich-Rowley Town lines and a 2.39 acre parcel abutting the High School on 
High Street. It is expected that both of these transactions will be success- 
fully consummated during 1989. 

In a most unusual action, the Town is being sued in Federal District Court by 
the Viladenis family of Central Street for allegedly unconstitutional actions 
which the Town and a landowner had taken in the area of Brown Square extension, 
a public way. This case is presently pending. 

Frequent conferences were held with the Town Manager, Building Inspector, and 
Town Engineer in efforts to avoid litigation and to compel voluntary compliance 
in advance with the applicable laws by numerous Town officials, landowners, and 
citizens without the necessity of frequent and unnecessary court activities. 
For the most part, these efforts were successful. 

****** 

TREASURER/COLLECTOR 
Virginia M. Cleary 

Many changes took place within the office during FY88. The issuance of Beach 
Stickers are now being handled through our office, with increased hours to 
accommodate residents. 

Liens were placed on all uncollected Real Estate taxes. A cash manjgemt it 
program between departments was implemented. Cash reconciliations were per- 
formed monthly between our office and the Accountants. A schedule of receipts 
report is given monthly to the Board of Selectmen. 

The following bills were sent to taxpayers: 

* Personal Property Farm Animal Excise 

Real Estate Sewer Betterment 

Motor Vehicle Excise Boat Excise 

A special thanks to Gloria Klimasewski, Joanna Lendh, Susan Lemieux, and 
William Handren for all their help and support during this transition year. 

-71- 



WATER/SEWER DEPARTMENTS 
James E. Chase, Engineer 

Our new 2.5 million gallon per day Filtration Plant went on line July 15, 1988. 

The following extensions were added to our distribution system in 1988; with the 
exceptions of Farley Avenue and Three Sisters Circle, all were at the Ipswich 
Country Club: 

Cape Ann Circle 
Choate Lane 
Country Club Circle 
Country Club Court 
Country Club Way 
Country Club Way 
Court Lane 
Edge Street 
Fairways, The 
Farley Avenue 



310' 


- 8' 


1 PVC 


Hawk Hill Court 


360' 


- 8" 


PVC 


1700' 


- 10' 


' PVC 


Hawk Hill Lane 


700' 


- 8" 


PVC 


330' 


- 8' 


' PVC 


Hawk Hill Lane 


560' 


- 10" 


PVC 


370' 


- 8' 


' PVC 


Highwood Lane 


1100' 


- 10" 


PVC 


1430' 


- 8' 


' PVC 


Long Ridge Lane 


210' 


- 8" 


PVC 


1780' 


- 10' 


1 PVC 


Long Ridge Lane 


210' 


- 10" 


PVC 


480' 


- 10' 


' PVC 


Southpoint Lane 


1910' 


- 10" 


PVC 


1230' 


- 10' 


' PVC 


Three Sisters Circle 


2200' 


- 8" 


PVC 


630' 


- 10' 


' PVC 


Cross-Country 


580' 


- 8" 


PVC 


560' 


- 8' 


1 PVC 


Cross-Country 


5100' 


- 10" 


PVC 



Water Division 

Charles Mantsourani , Filtration Superintendent 

Gilbert J. Elliott, Water Foreman 



1985 



1986 



1987 



1988 



New Meters Installed 
Meters Replaced 
Services Turned Off 
Services Turned On 
New Services 
Services Discontinued 
Hydrants Installed 
Hydrants Replaced 
New Water Mains Installed 
Total Length of Mains 

Water Services 
Metered Services 
Unmetered Services 
Summer Services 

Water Usage 
Dow's Reservoir 
Brown's Wei 1 
Winthrop Wells 
Mile Lane Wei 1 
Essex Road Wei 1 
Fellow's Road Well 
Total Water Usage 

Highest Day: 12/05/85 

Highest Day: 2/08/86 

Highest Day: 7/20/87 

Highest Day: 7/08/88 



52 




46 




114 


76 


85 




98 




109 


154 


83 




11 




56 


98 


93 




118 




154 


135 


34 




148 




76 


77 


3 




2 




4 


3 


5 




31 




13 


29 












1 


3 


8,285' 




14,065' 




7,700' 


21,750' 


419,245' 




433,310' 




441,010' 


462,760' 


3,616 




3,662 




3,776 


3,852 


72 




70 




109 


94 


71 




71 




15 


15 


119,779,000 


82 


,249,000 


25 


,754,000 


124,466,000 


47,660,200 


76 


,932,000 


103 


,760,000 


91,946,000 


28,729,500 


30 


,300,000 


58 


,172,000 


31,225,000 


15,413,000 


18 


,574,000 


30 


,781,000 


21,617,000 


14,445,400 


21 


,766,000 


55 


,505,000 


37,738,000 


23,592,300 


28 


,139,000 


45 


,702,000 


40,356,000 


249,619,400 


257 


,960,000 


319 


,674,000 


348,351,000 


1,593,000 


1 


,523,000 


2 


413,000 


2,004,000 



-72- 



Wastewater Division 

Timothy J. Henry, Superintendent 



1985 



1986 



1987 



1988 



Sewage Treated Daily 

(Average Gallons) 
Total Sewage Treated 

(Gallons) 
Septage (Gallons) 

Highest Daily Flow: 9/06/85 

Highest Daily Flow: 4/20/86 

Highest Daily Flow: 4/06/87 

Highest Daily Flow: 2/20/88 

Total Precipitation (Inches) 

Highest Daily Prec. 8/30/85 

Highest Daily Prec. 6/05/86 

Highest Daily Prec. 4/04/87 

Highest Daily Prec. 3/26/88 

Treatment 

Average Influent Suspended 

Solids mgl 
Average Effluent Suspended 



1,125,000 1,386,000 

410,985,000 506,326,000 
242,400 



1,145,000 



1,095,000 



417,925,000 400,880,000 
485,500 681,390 



2,138,000 



42.05 



3.30 



2,641,000 



50.85 



2.85 



94 



81 



2,568,000 
51.35 

4.25 
70 



There was one addition to our collection system in 1988: 
Farley Avenue 580' - 8" AC 



1,983,000 
39.10 



2.30 



80 



Solids mgl 


4.2 


3.6 


3.3 


6.7 


Average Percent Removal, S.S. 


96 


96 


95 


92 


Average Influent BOD5 mgl 


143 


135 


121 


135 


Average Effluent BOD5 mgl 


6.5 


8.6 


7.4 


9.3 


Average Percent Removal BOD5 


95 


94 


94 


93 


Average Effluent pH 


6.5 


6.9 


6.9 


7.0 


Sludge Dewatering 










Digested Sludge to Vacuum 










Filters (Gallons) 


2,045,700 


2,348,300 


2,122,100 


2,056,000 


Average Digested Sludge 










Percent Solids 


2.2 


2.2 


2.2 


1.9 


Vacuum Filter Sludge Cake to 










Disposal (Pounds) 


341,000 


425,688 


375,055 


318,551 


Average Vacuum Filter Sludge 










Cake % Solids 


11.4 


11.8 


11.4 


11.0 


Chemicals 










Disinfection: Total Chlorine 




• 






(Pounds) 


7,080 


7,836 


5,475 


5,602 


Sludge Dewatering: 










Lime (Pounds) 


78,156 


98,060 


86,958 


106,752 


Ferric Chloride (Pounds) 


32,632 


28,412 


25,454 


37,300 


Collection System 










New Sewer Connections 


11 


40 


25 


22 


Total Sewer Connections 


1,424 


1,464 


1,489 


1,511 



-73- 



WHITTIER REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 
Eugene Hailson, Whittier Representative 
Richard M. Kay, Superintendent Director 

Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School is entering its sixteenth 
year. To date, we have graduated 4196 students from a regular day school 
program and 641 students from our post secondary courses. 

In accordance with the provisions of the School Improvement Law (Chapter 188), 
Whittier has accomplished the following: 

1. The School Improvement Council 

The School Improvement Council comprised of administrators, teachers, 
parents, and students has met a number of times and has recommended using the 
grant monies for a Rotary Cutting Machine, an Apple Share Server, 10 Local Talk 
Connector Kits, 5 Image Writer II Printers, a Claris Appleworks/Network, and the 
balance of the account to be spent on software. These monies total $11,132.00. 

2. Horace Mann Grants 

Progress is ongoing in four projects approved by the School Committee for 
teachers to develop various proposals which could result in student benefit, an 
Informational/Public Relations Brochure, Health Education Elective, Dropout 
Analysis, and a Computer Software Evaluation Process. 

Recently Whittier Regional has been approved for over $540,000 in energy grants. 
The measures involved are savings of energy through exhaust air heat recovery, 
room and shop air circulation systems, lighting fixtures and lamp replacement, 
and an air lock. These measures will enable the school to decrease its energy 
needs and, therefore, result in savings to the communities. 

Whittier Regional has recently received notification from the New England 
Association of Schools and Colleges that our school accreditation has been 
reviewed and accepted without change in membership status; and that our 2-year 
progress report has been accepted with satisfaction on the progress realized 
since the school's evaluation in 1986. 

The enrollment for the Evening School from your community: 24 

The October 1, 1987, Day School enrollment: 

1 Boy 1 Girl 
3 
4 
2 Total 31 

Post Secondary: 
1988 Graduates: 7 

The cost to your community for the school year 1987-1988 was $103,404.00 



-74- 



Grade 9 


1 


10 


8 


11 


7 


12 


5 



****** 



ELECTRIC DEPARTMENT 
Donald R. Stone, Sr. 

In 1988, we saw an increase in the number of electrical services of 99; bringing 
the total number of residential, municipal, business and commercial customers to 
5,683. Generation at the Power Plant reached a new high again in 1988. 
Distribution continued a maintenance and upgrade program that has been 
established over the last five years. In 1988, Ipswich sold 92,674,990 kWH's, 
an increase of 8.4%. 

A recent study of municipal electric companies in Massachusetts showed that our 
residential rates remain among the lowest in the state. 



****** 



METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 
William E. Bingham, MAPC Representative 

The Metropolitan Area Planning Council would like to thank Ipswich for its sup- 
port. During fiscal year 1988, which runs from July 1, 1987, through June 30, 
1988, the community contributed .1854 percapita, or $2,144 to MAPC for regional 
planning services. 

With the support of Ipswich and 100 other communities in the metropolitan Boston 
area, MAPC provided planning services, information, and advice for sub-regional 
and region-wide initiatives in the areas of land use, economic development, 
housing, transportation and environmental quality. 

Projects completed during calendar year 1988 and of direct benefit to Ipswich 
include: 

° Municipal officials from the North Shore Transportation 
Task Force cities and towns agreed upon 10 transportation 
priorities during 1988. They were developed from 160 
problem areas identified by Task Force officials and MAPC 
staff. 

MAPC staff began producing a MacConnell Map for this 

community. Funded by the State Department of Public Works, 
MAPC together with the State Hazardous Waste Facility 
Site Safety Council (HWFSSC) created land use maps from 
aerial photographs. Land use information was also 
translated into statistics. Both map and statistics will 
be delivered to the community in 1989. 

Regionally, MAPC continued to work on MetroPlan 2000, the agency's comprehensive 
regional plan, developing new population, employment and retail trade forecasts; 
an inventory of more than 600 vacant commercial and industrial sites; and 
several resource papers on affordable housing issues, regional transportation 
improvements, and land use projects. 

-75- 



MAPC also worked for additional funds for local pavement management programs and 
coordinated the local TIP review, which provides federal funds for local highway 
projects. 

Finally, MAPC completed prototype projects which are applicable to all com- 
munities. For example, in Cambridge, the agency developed a transportation 
management zoning report which provides land use recommendations designed to 
reduce site-specific traffic. 

MAPC appreciates the continued support of Ipswich and looks forward to further 
service in the years ahead. 

****** 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

James Theodosopoulos, Chairman 

In 1988, 85 petitions were presented to the Zoning Board of Appeals. There 
were 54 requests for Special Permits, of which 50 were granted. There were 21 
requests for Variances, of which 13 were granted. Ten petitions were withdrawn 
or dismissed. 

During the year, Dave Levesque was re-appointed as a regular member for a five- 
year term; and John Verani and Joseph R. Petranek were re-appointed as associate 
members for a one-year term. Jim Theodosopoulos was re-elected chairman and 
Doug Denninger as vice chairman. 

****** 

IPSWICH HOUSING AUTHORITY 
Sara S. O'Connor, Chairman 

The Ipswich Housing Authority has made enormous strides in 1988 towards the goal 
of providing affordable housing for Ipswich residents. By responding to the 
request made by the Selectmen to provide a site for 20 units of family housing, 
the Authority has been successful in keeping alive the linkage between Cable 
Hospital, the Town of Ipswich and the IHA. An option to purchase a parcel of 
land was signed by the Chairman of the IHA in December of 1988. The family 
units are therefore well on the way to becoming a reality for Ipswich families. 

Mentally Handicapped Home 

An Open House was held in 1988 for parents of future tenants. A tour of the 
home by parents and officials from all areas of the state resulted in a common 
thought that the home for the mentally handicapped in Ipswich would be a model 
home for others to duplicate. Once again the IHA has taken a leadership role in 
providing housing for all people of low income. 

Elderly Housing Development 

The progress on the elderly development is moving along at a good pace. 
Presently the IHA has six sites that have EOCD approval. The Board of 
Commissioners will bring to a vote their choice upon reviewing all final sub- 
missions by the interested parties. Thus, 44 units for elderly Ipswich resi- 
dents will be one step closer to completion. 

-76- 



The Board of Commissioners once again thank our Director, Raymond Daniels, Sr., 
for his strong commitment to the IHA and affordable housing in the Town of 
Ipswich. To the staff, and in particular to Frieda Duff and Margie Shute, who 
will retire after years of committed service, we appreciate their support and 
teamwork that has made us so successful in our efforts to provide housing to 
those who would be otherwise without a home. 

The Authority strives to maintain and upgrade all of its housing stock via nor- 
mal maintenance and state funded modernization programs. Although this is an 
ongoing effort, some highlights of the current program include road rebuilding 
at Caroline Avenue, upgrading of electrical services at Southern Heights as well 
as new appliances at two developments. The modernization budget is now 
approaching one million dollars. 

Summary of units by program : 

Veterans Housing Chapter 200-1 Southern Heights 24 

Family Housing Chapter 705 Agawam Village 14 

Elderly Housing Chapter 667 Agawam Village 200 

State Rental Assistance Chapter 707 (private apartments) 89 

Federally Assisted Leases Section 8 (private apartments) 30 

Special Needs Group Home Chapter 689 8 

365 sub. 

Units in Development & Planning : 

Cable Gardens Rental Assistance Chapter 707 28 

Family Housing Chapter 705 20 

Elderly Housing Chapter 667 44 

92 sub. 

Total 457 
****** 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
REVENUE SHARING HANDICAPPED REGULATIONS 

This notice is published pursuant to the requirements of Section 51.55 of the 
Revenue Sharing Regulations, as published in the Federal Register on October 17, 
1983. Section 51.55 prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals 
because of their handicapped status. 

The Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts, advises the public, employees and job appli- 
cants that it does not discriminate on the basis of handicapped status in 
admission or access to, or treatment or employment in, its programs and 
activities. 

The Town of Ipswich has designated the following (person or office) as the con- 
tact to coordinate efforts to comply with this requirement. Inquiries should be 
directed to: 

Name: George E. Howe 
Office: Town Manager 
Address: Town Hall, South Main Street 
Phone Number: 356-4848 

Hours: 8 a.m. - 7 p.m. Mondays 

8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Tues.-Thurs. 
8 a.m. - 12 noon Fridays 

-77- 



FEOFFEES OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL 
IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 

Balance, July 1, 1987 $ 25,801.38 

Cash Received ' 254,526.82 

Expenditures 266,141.18 

Balance, June 30, 1988 14,187.02 



Little Neck valued at 5,414,900.00 

Buildings - Community Center and Barn 23,320.00 

Cash in First National Bank of Ipswich 14,187.02 

On Deposit - Ipswich Cooperative Bank 2,000.00 

On Deposit - Ipswich Savings Bank 1,267.97 

$5,455,674.99 



SCHEDULE I 
CASH RECEIPTS 

July 1, 1987 - June 30, 1988 



Buildings and Land Taxes 189,216.55 

Rents 64,210.00 

Late Payment Interst & Miscellaneous 

$254,526.82 



SCHEDULE A 
RECONCILIATION OF CASH RECEIPTS 



Balance, July 1, 1987 25,801.38 

Cash Receipts - Schedule I 254,526.82 

280,328.20 
Expenditures - Schedule II 266,141.18 

$ 14,187.02 



SCHEDULE II 
EXPENDITURES 

• July 1, 1987 - June 30, 1988 

Taxes - Town of Ipswich 225,533.79 

Repairs and Upkeep 

Water 5,111.13 

Wharf & Docks 1,033.91 

Playgrounds 2,172.00 

Tree Work 3,069.00 

Community Center 4,818.17 

Maintenance 2,000.00 

-78- 



FEOFEES OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL 
(Continued) 



Schedule II (Continued) 

Salaries & Expenses 
Salaries 
Transportation 
Police 

Office Supplies 
Meetings & Dinners 
Telephone 
Insurance 
Legal 
Signs 



4,200.00 

1,800.00 

3,617.89 

225.33 

230.75 

181.50 

11,494.02 

150.00 

503.69 

$266,141.18 



***••* 



BURLEY EDUCATION FUND 

Balance on hand January 1, 1988 $26,818.29 

Income from funds for year 1988 as follows: 
Interest: Ipswich Co-Operative Bank 

Money Market Certificate 2,080.26 

Balance on hand January 1, 1989, as follows: 

Ipswich Co-Operative Bank Money Market Certificate $28,898.55 



-79- 



TRUSTEES OF THE IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 
STATEMENTS OF FUND ACTIVITY 

July 1, 1987 to June 30, 1988 

I. BOOK FUND AND MEMORIAL FUNDS 

Balance - June 1, 1987 $12,343.89 

Contributions: 2,748.41 

Interest Income: 743.40 

Expenditures: 

Books (1,499.07) 

Other ( 227.91) (1,726.98) 

Balance - June 30, 1988 $14,108.72 

II. IPSWICH SPEAKS FUND 

Balance - July 1, 1987 $ 935.81 

Interest Income: 68.17 

Balance - June 30, 1988 $ 1,003.98 

III. LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 

Balance Received July 1, 1987 $62,615.25 

Expenditure: 

Architect 's Fees 

(expansion plans) (9,753.13) 

Interest Income: 

Building Fund $1,406.93 

Augustine Heard Fund 1,020.82 

Elizabeth R. Lathrop Fund 105.78 

Adelade B. Lockhart Fund 52.89 

Abby L. Newman Fudn 317.35 

George Spiller Fund 89.93 

Daniel Treadwell Fund 2,279.65 

Wales Endowment Fund 15.87 5,289.22 

Balance - June 30, 1988 

Building Fund 15,468.26 

Augustine Heard Fund 11,223.21 

Elizabeth R. Lathrop Fund 1,163.03 

Adelade B. Lockhart Fund 581.51 

Abby L. Newman Fund 3,489.08 

George Spiller Fund 988.57 

Daniel Treadwell Fund 25,063.23 

Wales Endowment Fund 174.45 $58,151.34 



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■90- 



TOWN OF IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 
NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
June 30, 1988 

1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies 

The accounting policies for financial reporting purposes of 
the Town of Ipswich conform to generally accepted accounting 
principles for local governmental units except as indicated 
in note 2. 

A. Fund Accounting 

The Town reports its financial activities in several 
funds and one account group in order to comply with the 
limitations and restrictions placed on both the re- 
sources made available to the Town and the services pro- 
vided. The various funds are grouped in the financial 
statements in this report into six generic fund types 
and three broad fund categories as follows: 

GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS 

General Fund 

The general fund is the general operating fund of the 

Town. It is used to account for all financial resources 

except those required to be accounted for in another 

fund. 

Special Revenue Fund - General Revenue Sharing 
This special revenue fund is used to account for the 
proceeds of the State and Local Fiscal Assistance Act 
and their expenditures as prescribed by the Office of 
Federal Revenue Sharing. 

Special Revenue Funds - Other 

This special revenue fund is used to account for the pro- 
ceeds of specific revenue resources (other than general 
revenue sharing, expendable trusts of major capital pro- 
jects) that are legally restricted to expenditures for 
specified purposes. 

Capital Projects Fund 

The capital projects funds are used to account for 
financial resources to be used for the acquisition or 
construction of major, facilities (other than those 
financed by proprietary funds and trust funds) . 

PROPRIETARY FUND 

Sewer - Water - Electric Funds 

Sewer, Water, and electic funds are used to account for 
operations (a) that are financed and operated in a manner 
similar to private business enterprises - where the in- 
tent of the governing body is that the costs of providing 



-91- 



goods or services to the general public on a continuing 
basis be financed or recovered primarily through user 
charges; or (b) where the governing body has decided 
that periodic determination of revenues earned, expenses 
incurred, and/or net income is appropriate for capital 
maintenance, public policy, management control, account- 
ability, or other 'purposes where all financial transactions 
are maintained as separate funds - namely, Sewer Fund, 
Water Fund, Electric Fund. 

FIDUCIARY FUNDS 

Trust and Agency Funds 

Trust and agency funds are used to account for assets held 
by the Town in a trustee capacity or as an agent for 
individuals, private organizations, other governments 
and/or other funds. These include expendable trust, non- 
expendable trust and agency funds. Nonexpendable trust 
funds are accounted for in a manner that permits the 
periodic measurement of revenues earned, expenses in- 
curred and/or net income in order to demonstrate main- 
tenance of capital. Expendable trust funds are accounted 
for in essentially the same manner as governmental funds. 
Agency funds are custodial in nature (assets equal liabilities) 
and do not involve measurement of results of operations. 

ACCOUNT GROUP 

Long-Term Debt and Liabilities - LongrrTerm -liabilities expected 
to be financed from governmental funds are accumulated in 
the general long-term debt group of accounts. This account 
group is not a fund. It is only concerned with the 
measurement of finanacial position and therefore, is not 
involved with a measurement of the results from any operation. 

Basis of Accounting 

The accompanying financial statements, except for the 
enterprise funds as noted below, have been prepared prin- 
cipally on the modified accrual basis of accounting. This 
method recognizes revenues when they become measurable and 
available. Expenses are recognized under this method as 
they are incurred. 

The accompanying financial statements of the enterprise fund 
have been prepared and presented on the accrual basis of 
accounting. Under this method, revenues are recognized in 
the accounting period in which they are earned and expenses 
are recognized when the related liability is incurred. 



-92- 



Revenue Recognition 

Property tax revenues are recognized as revenue when they 
become available. Available means then due, or past due 
and receivable within the current period, or expected to be 
collected soon enough thereafter to be used to pay liabilities 
of the current period. 

All other revenues are recognized throughout the year when 
cash is received. Receipts during the sixty days 
immediately following the close of the fiscal year are also 
recognized as available revenue. 

In applying the susceptible to accrual concept to inter- 
governmental revenues, the legal and contractual re- 
quirements of the numerous individual programs are used 
as guidance. There are, however, essentially two types 
of these revenues. In one, monies must be expected on the 
specific purpose or project before any amounts will be paid 
to the Town, therefore, revenues are recognized based upon 
the expenditures recorded. In the other, monies are virt- 
ually unrestricted as to purpose of expenditure and are 
ususally revocable only for failure to comply with pre- 
scribed compliance requirements. These resources are re- 
flected as revenues at the time of receipt or earlier if the 
susceptible to accrual criteria is met. 

Expenses 

Expenditures are recorded during the year on a cash dis- 
bursement basis. In addition, as required by Massachusetts 
General Laws, disbursements made during the fifteen days 
immediately following the close of each fiscal year and 
which pertain to the prior year are recorded as expenses as 
of June 30th. 

Purchase orders outstanding at June 30th related to annual 
operating expenses are recorded as encumbrances and, accord- 
ingly, as a reservation of fund balances at that date. 

GAAP Basis Amounts - Property taxes on the combined state- 
ment of revenues and expenditures - budget and actual - 
general and revenue sharing funds (exhibit 3) has been 
stated in accordance with interpretation number 3 issued by 
the National Council on Governmental Accounting. 

2. Departures from Generally Accepted Accounting Principles 

During 1981, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts issued a revised 
uniform municipal accounting system entitles "U.M.A.S." The de- 
partures from G.A.A.P. under this revised system have been 
significantly narrowed. The town has adopted the revised uniform 
municipal accounting system entitled U.M.A.S. since 1981. 



-93- 



The significant departures from G.A.A.P. included in the 
Town of Ipswich's financial statements are: 

A. Retirement benefits are provided for on a "pay-as-you 
go" basis rather than a acceptable actuarial cost 
method (note8) . 

B. General fund fixed asset acquisitions are recorded as 
expenditures at the time purchases are made rather 
than being capitalized in a general fixed asset group 
of accounts. 

C. Purchases for materials and supplies inventories are 
recorded as expenditures rather than assets at the 
time of purchase. 

3. Deferred Revenue 

Property taxes and other revenues that are measurable but 
not available have been classified as deferred revenue on 
June 30, 1988 as follows: 

Outstanding property taxes June 30, 1988 28,716. 

Motor Vehicle, boat and farm excise 408,293. 

Tax Liens 113,953. 

Departmentals (45,981) . 

Total 504,981 . 

4. Provision for Property Tax Abatements and Exemptions 
Provision for property tax abatements and exemptions are 
established for each annual tax levy as prescribed by 
statue. The primary intent is to provide for these po- 
tential refunds or allowances during the year in which the 
tax would otherwise be due and collected. Excessive amounts 
no longer necessary are transferred to fund balance reserved 
for extraordinary or unforseen expenses as prescribed by the 
Massachusetts General Laws. 

5. Reserve for Extraordinary or Unforeseen Expenses 

The balance in this account represents the transfer of 
excess amounts from the "Provision for Abatement and 
Exemption" accounts. This account was previously known or 
classified as "Overlay Surplus" to be appropriated by the 
town meeting vote for extraordinary or unforseen expenses in 
accordance with Chapter 59, Section 25, Massachusetts 
General Laws. 

6. Reserve for Encumbrances 

The balance in this account is made up of current and prior 
years unexpended appropriations carried forward. 

7. Unreserved Fund Balances - Designated 

Certain budgetary surplus and deficits must, according to 
the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, be 



-94- 



utilized to reduce or be raised in the next subsequent tax 
rate. These items have been included within the unreserved 
fund balance pursuant to G.A.A.P. 

State and County over /underassessment , net, result from an 
excess of amounts raised in the tax levy of the current year 
as compared to the actual expenditures made for such purposes 
These amounts will be utilized to reduce the 1989 tax levy. 

Appropriation deficits resulted from expenditures of the 
accounts listed that exceed their appropriation during the 
fiscal year. 

8. Pension Plans 

Substantially, all employees of the Town, except school 
teachers and certain other school department employees 
are members of the Essex County Retirement System. The 
pension plan provides retirement benefits for members 
who have attained a certain age and for periods of 
service. Members contribute certain percentages of 
their salaries or wages to the plan. In addition, the 
Massachusetts Division of Insurance determined an 
amount, each year, that the Town must contribute to the 
system in order to meet that year's projected benefit 
payment. 

This so called "pay-as-you-go" method does not provide 
for the funding of any unfunded liabilities that might 
exist as a result of an actuarial determination of the 
fiscal condition of the plan. The amount of the un- 
funded liability of the Essex County Retirement System 
is actuarialy determined periodically and reported to 
the Town of Massachusetts Retirement Law Commission. 
The most recent actuarial valuation was prepared as of 
January 01, 1979. At that date, the actuarialy computed 
value of unfunded pension benefits attributable to the 
Town of Ipswich amounted to $5,856,650. 

Teachers and certain administrative employees of the 
School Department participate in a contributory retire- 
ment plan administered by the Massachusetts Teachers' 
Retirement Board. The Town does not contribute to this 
plan. 

9. Unemployment Compensation 

The Town is on the reimbursable method for paying unem- 
ployment compensation. Under the reimbursable method, the 
Massachusetts Employment Security Division sends a list 
quarterly to the community of who has received benefits. 
The community then reimburses the Massachusetts Employ- 
ment Security Division for these clients against the Town. 



-95- 



10. Workmen's Compensation 

The Town insures its workers with Utica National Insurance 
Company, which computed its premium by estimating the Town's 
payroll and utilizing the rates per hundred established by 
the State Division of Insurance. 

11. Vacation and Sick Pay 

Employees earn vacation and sick leave as they provide 
services. Vacation accumulation is limited to the current 
year. Sick leave accumulates for various groups of em- 
ployees based upon the respective collection bargaining 
agreements. Sick leave accumulates at the rate of one and 
one-quarter days per month. Maximum sick leave accumulation 
is 150 days for firefighters, 165 days for policemen, and 
165 days for all other town employees. The cost of vacation 
and sick leave benefits is accounted for as an operation 
expenditure of the general fund, when paid. Sick leave 
benefits are paid only when taken and, therefore, not paid 
to employees upon termination. The accumulated sick leave 
benefits on June 30, 1988 have not been determined. 

12. Summary of Long-Term Debt 

A summary of the Long-Term Debt is presented below: 

See Schedule II 



-96- 



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